Nasty Fire in New Orleans

Nasty Fire in New Orleans

Chief Pujol, of the New Orleans fire department, says that a recent fire in the Tulane Arcade, was “one of the hardest to fight that department has had to fight in many a day. The glass top of that arcade made it impossible for the men to know where to break through to get at the windows of the building on the side in which the fire was burning, and a number of those big glasses had to be punched through with ladders before the windows could finally be located. Such places as that should be constructed with a dark glass opposite the windows of the next building to indicate where entrance can be had, and thus avoid the loss of valuable time. As it was, the only possible way to fight was to follow the fire up the stairway. The smoke was kept in by the tin roof, and consequently settled, and the men had to fight through it for a time and then back out and go in again. Altogether, it was about the nastiest proposition to fight I have seen lately, and the loss of about $9,000 is remarkably small under the circumstances.” To Assistant Chief Jules Pujol was largely due the prompt and efficacious work done by the firemen. He was quite a distance off when he saw someone turn in the alarm. As soon as he was told the location of the fire he ran to the scene and set men and apparatus to work. The first piece of apparatus to arrive was a chemical engine. It was followed immediately by two steamers. The assistant chief at once got two leads of hose run into the burning building and thus really saved the day.

CHIEF LOUIS PUJOL, NEW ORLEANS, LA.CHIEF W. H. BYWATER, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.CHIEF THOMAS BALLANTYNE, SAVANNAH, GA.

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