New Bedford Water Report.

New Bedford Water Report.

The maximum daily consumption at New Bedford, Mass., during the past year was on July 6— 10,420,122 gal., the minimum, 4,778,132; daily average, 7,488,160. This is quite large, but, then, as Superintendent R. C. P. Coggeshall remarks, the use of water in the city departments is “extravagant,” and with “absolutely no restriction,” as no charge is exacted in any instance. Water is supplied to the fire hydrants “for all sorts of purposes in street and sewer department operations, not only free of cost, but this department is obliged to meet all expense in maintaining these hydrants in good working order. This service wears upon these hydrants, and the expense of keeping them in order is far in advance of what it would be simply to maintain them for fireprotection purposes—and they are supposed to he set exclusively for the last named purpose. Watermotors for power-purposes are used in some schoolhotises and in several of the fire department stations. This is attractive, because it shifts the cost of power thus obtained upon the water department funds.” Two school buildings in the city during the past two years, both containing meters, have used water, which, if charged for would have amounted to $4,062.94 for over 27,000,000 gal.—half the capacity of High Hill reservoirs. There are about thirty school buildings supplied free in New Bedford. The existing system was begun twelve years ago, and was intended for a daily supply of 10,000,000 gal., at the rate of 100 gal. per-capita per day. When the additional storage-supply was secured, twelve years ago, it was thought the supply would be enough to last for a lifetime and give water sufficient for 100,000 people. But in twelve years the population has increased some 30,000, and the 100,000 mark will be reached in a few months. There will still he a margin, however, as the pumping equipment and reservoir are adequate for any demand likely to be made upon them for some time to come. There is one important link however, that should he reinforced. The simple distributing pipe, which brings the water from High Hill reservoir to the city hall, should be duplicated in case of a break—that is of obligation. as is. also, checking the daily consumption from further increase by meterage—meters to be installed on unmetered services at a certain rate per cent, every year. The estimated population of this city today is 89,000; on the lines of pipe, 83,000; supplied, 82,000. The total consumption for the year was 2,740,666,728 gal., of which 982,403,330 gal. passed through meters. The per-capita consumption is 84 gal.; each consumer, 91; each tap, 653 gal. The cost of supplying water per 1,000,000 gal., figured on total maintenance, is $20.73; on total maintenance plus interest on bonds, $44.47. The mains are of cast iron, 36-in. to 4-in. They were extended 22,852 ft. during the year, and the total now’ in use amounts to within a few yards of 114 miles. The number of leaks per mile was .07; pipes of less than 4-in. nearly 1 mile. Twenty-nine public and private hydrants were added—making 1,182 public and private now in use. Of stop-gates, 59 were added during the year—making a total of 1,394 now’ in use, of which 111 are less than 4-in. Of blow’-offs, there are 106; range of pressure on mains, 95 to 25 lb. Four hundred and nine services were added during the year, making 11,516 (77.24 miles) in use. the size varying from 1/2-in. to 10-in. They are of lead, wrought and cast iron, and are of an average length of 35.4 ft., the average cost of each being for the year (a) gross, $20.55; (b) feet, $8.11. Electrolysis caused by the Union street railway is common, although the 48-in. force-main in free water and the 36-in. supply main have not suffered much.

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