New Britain Annual Water Report

New Britain Annual Water Report

The water commissioners of New Britain. Conn., in their annual report for the year ending March 31, 1914. state the receipts amounted to $168,493.94 and the expenditures to $138,886.36. The meter water rents amounted to $147,868.64 and the schedule water rents to $291.50. The capacity of the city’s reservoirs are as follows: Shuttle Meadow Lake, $1,400,000,000 gallons; Wolcott, 142,000,000 gallons; Burlington, 60,000,-000 gallons; high service reservoir, 3,000,000 gallons. In speaking of Shuttle Meadow the report says: “This reservoir reached its lowest point, namely, 16.9 on October 6, 1913, and at that time it contained about eight hundred million gallons, so at no time during the past year has there been any question as to the sufficiency of the water supply. The reservoir has filled up. as expected, from the spring rains. Last summer an overflow with a sluice gate was installed at the east canal, same connecting with the old spillway, and the necessity of this has already been demonstrated. While it was not intended to build a spillway from the west canal until the coming summer, the construction of the Municipal Ice House required a portion of this to be put in late in the season. This was done and the connection to the canal will be installed as soon as weather conditions will permit.” The chemist’s report says: “The average of the monthly chemical analyses of the water is as follows: Total solids. 48; volatile solids, 20; free ammonia, 0.024; albuminoid ammonia, 0.075; nitrogen as nitrites, none; nitrogen as nitrates, 0.38; oxygen consumed, 2.48; chlorine, 2.2. It should be further stated that the monthly analyses have varied only to a very slight degree from the yearly average. This shows that the city supply is of uniform quality and an interpretation of the analyses shows that the water is in good sanitary condition and safe for drinking purposes. The trouble usually found in surface water supplies throughout the state due to plant growth has been less than usual in your supply during the past year. Only for a few weeks in the fall was this trouble noticeable to consumers.” J. H. Towers is superintendent.

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