New Conditions to Govern Apparatus Tests at I. A. F. E. Convention

New Conditions to Govern Apparatus Tests at I. A. F. E. Convention

On account of a rearranging of the program of the International Association of Fire Engineers’ convention to be held in New York in September, there have been some radical changes in the conditions that are to govern the tests of apparatus on that occasion. Below may be found a record of the alterations as prepared by George W. Booth, chief engineer of the National Board of Fire Underwriters and approved by the association and member of the local committee. The tests as originally arranged were printed in our issue of April lb:

Exhibitors will be required to state in advance the rating they place on their pumping engines, that is, gallons discharged at 120 pounds net pressure, at 200 pounds net pressure and at 250 pounds net pressure, or higher if the , exhibitor elects; and exhibitors will be required to arrange for a preliminary test on Monday or Tuesday of convention week, or preferably during the preceding week, to ’verify these ratings. The preliminary test is expected to be sufficiently exhaustive to determine how much water each engine can deliver at the various pressures above specified. Imt it is to be definitely understood that this delivery shall be no more than can be maintained for the full period of the final test. An engine able to deliver, for example, 740 gallons at 120 pounds net pressure will be given a corresponding layout of hose and nozzles, unless the exhibitor desires a lay-out which will enable bis engine to deliver its discharge at a higher net pressure. Ratings of engines will be considered as the next lower even 50 gallons than the quantity delivered at the preliminary test; for example, an engine delivering 740 gallons at 120 pounds net pressure, will be rated at 700 gallons, and an engine delivering 880 gallons will be rated at 850 gallons. Any engine rated at less than 700 gallons will be permitted to use a suction not more than 4½ inches inside diameter; any engine rated at 700 to 850 gallons will be permitted to use a 5-inch suction; any engine rated at 900 gallons or more will be permitted to use a 0-inch suction. The committee reserves the right, after the completion of the tests, to place any engine in another class than the one in which it is entered. The test will continue for a duration of twelve hours, hut provision will made for any exhibitor who so elects to continue for an additional period, deity ering rated capacity at 120 pounds net pressure, lhe first 12-hour run will be divided as follows:

Six hours delivering at 120 pounds net pressure the quantity determined by the preliminary test.

Three hours delivering at 200 pounds net pressure the quantity determined by the preliminary test.

Three hours delivering at 250 pounds net pressure the quantity determined by the preliminary test.

Note If any engine is unable to maintain tile net pressures noted above, tthe maximum obtainable pressure will be substituted.

During any of the runs not more than two men at one time will be atloyved to operate or care for the engine, and men may be relieved every four or six hours. At some consentient time, possibly during the preliminary test, a shut-off nozzle test will be made; the conditions will require discharging through one line of hose with 1 G -inch nozzle, with a pump pressure of 75 to 120 pounds, and the effect of shutting off on the engine and the relief valve will be observed. Exhibitors will be required to furnish in advance a chart showing the measured brake horsepower developed by their engines at rates of speed within the range likely to be reached during the tests.

Provisions must be made by the exhibitor on each engine for measuring its speed, and the exhibitor must give exact dimensions of engine cylinders and length of stroke; from these the piston displacement in cubic inches per minute will be figured, and comparisons will lie made between tile piston displacement, the brake horsepower of the engine and the power developed by the pump.

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