NEW FIRE HOUSE, NEW YORK CITY.

NEW FIRE HOUSE, NEW YORK CITY.

With this notice wo give a cut of the fine now firehouse at the northeastern corner of White and Elm streets, where engine company No. 13—a double company will be located. It will be ready about the new year. It stands on the site of the city’s old armory, just on the edge of the Collect pond, and immediately opposite the new Criminal Courts building. It is in the early French renaissance style, with the outer walls of Indiana sandstone. There are two stories in the main part of the main building, and a third floor in the high-pointed roof, which rises with a sharp pitch until its ornamental crest stands eighty feet above the sidewalk. At the corner 1B a small octagonal tower, which is surmounted by a sharply pitched cap of slate. The roof itself is also of slate and copper. The plot is of a slightly irregular form, of about seventytwo feet on Elm street, and 111 feet on White street. Looking at the Elm street front one sees on the main floor three large doors with arched tops, which will be the entrances for the two fire engines of the double company and for the water tower.

Besides and between these are smaller doors and windows, each in the same style. Similar windows extend to the tower and to the White street side, and to the eastern end of the White street side is another doorway leading into the one-story extension which forms the fuel depot. Delicate carvings are on stone ornament doors and windows. Over the windows these carvings are symbolical of fire and water. In the arched recesses directly over the windows are conventional representations of the scallop shell, and on either side flaming torches of candelabra. This idea is further carried out by the brackets which finish either side of the main dormer window of the front, wlicredolphins take the place of the scrolls. On the second floor, the windows of the Elm street front arc grouped into three sets of mullioncd openings. In the centre of five windows thus grouped and on either side are three windows similarly grouped. The third floor has three dormer windows to light it upon the front. The main floor of the main building contains the apparatus rooms. The chief room is that in which will stand the two engines. This room is 77 feet deep and 45 feet 6 inches wide. The patrol clerk is to stand within a railing of solid bronze, where the man on duty will have grouped around him speaking tubes leading to every part of the house, a telephone, and the call bell, and other alarm instruments connected with the fire telegraph lines. stairs leading to the second floor. These stairs are of steel, with Italian marble steps. At the back of the room are the stalls for the ten horses, These stalls, instead of being open and having the horses in them held by bridles connected to electrically tripped catches, will have oak doors; be solid at the bottom, but grated above to allow of a free circulation of air. The doors for each pair of stalls will be hung from a central iron pillar, and will be opened outward by great spring hinges. The horses will stand unfastened, facing the street, and on an alarm of fire the electric trips will release the doors, and the doors will be swung open by their hinges and locked open, back to back, when they reach a point at right angles to their closed position. There will also be this same arrangement in the room for the water tower, where there are five stalls. This room is 24 feet fi inches wide by 77 feet deep, and, like the sidewalk, is floored in a peculiar kind of English slag brick of a buff color. The whole of the main floor is to be finished with whitu marble bases along the walls, and ubove this the walls are of glazed white porcelain tiles. The ceilings are of long leaved yellow pine. The captain’s room and those of his three lieutenants are on the second floor above and arc each 11×14 feet. Back of these is the dormitory, and back of that again a toilet room, with basins, closets, two porcelain-lined bath tubs, and a marble-inclosed needle bath. The floor is of marble mosaic. Over the water tower room is the chief’s room, of the same size. There is a large office 21×24 feet, a main room 24×40, and back of this his bedroom, with Imthroom iidjoinlng. A sitting or assembly room 38×64 feet. OJnches is on the third floor. It is fitted up with twenty-five clothes closets, sliding poles connecting it and all the floors. The hose tower opens from the engine room on the main floor. There is a large coal cellar under the north west corner of the main building in which are also two self-fcedng hollers for steam heating. This cellar is connected with a sidewalk elevator into a driveway which extends to the front of the workshop fuel and feed-room in a one story extension reaching about the east and north ends of the main building. This shop and feedroom are together Utxtfl feet and the fuel room .10×69 feet 6 inches. The upper floors are finished In oak and pine with plastered walls, the roof being supported on a steel cantilever frame resting on the four central piers of the home. Napoleon Le Bran A Hons were architects of this firehouse, which will cost when complete, about $80,000 exclusive of the site.

NEW YORK STATION, ENGINE CO. 13, N. Y. F. D.

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