NEW JERSEY FIRE NEWS.

NEW JERSEY FIRE NEWS.

Correspondence of FIRE & WATER ENGINEERING.

There is no change in the situation at Newark, so far as regards the retirement of Chief Kiersted.—The rule as to fire-escapes is being enforced very strictly in Newark. Its necessity was shown the other day. The tenement officers ordered an Italian owner to equip his house with fire-escapes. He could not be convinced of the need for the command, and argued that, as his house had been occupied eighteen years, and there had never been a fire, it was not necessary to build the escapes. The commission proceeded against him, and the fire-escapes were put up. Two days later a fire broke out in the building, and sixteen families were forced to use the escapes as the only means of exit. If the commission had been less strict, the twenty and more persons might have suffered, for the building was gutted by the fire.—The new seven-story building of the Newark Warehouse company will need no fireescapes. It stands in Mechanic street, between Ward and Lawrence streets. It is a long and deep building and has a capacity of 1,200 carloads of freight. It has a steel frame structure, with reinforced concrete walls and floors, and it is equiped throughout with the dry system of sprinklers. Water can be obtained from the high-pressure service of the city, maintaining a pressure of 140 lb. to the square inch; from two hemispherical bottom tanks of 30,000-gal. capacity each, carried 25 ft. above the roof of the building; or from two 750-gal. per minute electrically driven centrifugal pumps, drawing on a 150,000-gal. reservoir in the basement of the building. There are standpipes on each floor, with connections for 2 1/2-in. hose which can be used in case of necessity, and an approved watch-clock system, with several stations on each floor to insure the proper patrol of a number of watchmen. The building is equiped with the newest improved Gamewell auxiliary firealarm system, consisting of three auxiliary firealarm boxes on each floor (twenty-one auxiliary boxes in all), all of which are connected with a special private city fire-alarm box in the office of the building. Pulling any one of the twenty-one boxes sends an alarm to the city fire department without transmission. Attached to the Gamewell auxiliary system is a twenty-two-drop annunciator, which shows the office watchman the exact part of the building where there is a fire, if one should occur.— Woodbine fire department has chosen William Abrahamson as chief.—Morristown is having plans drawn preliminary to making the changes contemplated in the Speedwell avenue firehouse now occupied by Resolute hook and ladder company and Humane engine company. The engine company will be moved from its present quarters to the annex of the truckhouse, now occupied by the still-alarm wagon. The annex will be enlarged by building on the alley adjoining, thus giving the engine company plenty of room to put its apparatus side by side. Four stalls are planned for the rear of the house, and the company will put in horses to pull its machines. The still-alarm wagon will be moved over into the engine company’s quarters, and stalls be built in the rear for horses.—While no action has been taken on the purchase of a patrol wagon for the Morristown board of fire wardens, it is hinted that it will be forthcoming.—The Monmouth Beach fire department has elected John A. Manly chief and M. J. Burns and Fred. H. Cook respectively first and second assistant chiefs.— The death is announced of Thomas Harrop, who for eight years was chief of the Orange fire department, retiring in 1887. The deceased, who was born in Newark seventy-five vears ago. had lived at Montclair of late years. He was elected chief of the Orange department for the first time in 1876, serving till 1881, when, being of the opposite stripe of politics to the incoming administration, he was obliged to retire, but was reappointed in 18S4, when a new administration came into power. Former Chief Harrop was a Civil war veteran, a member of the Grand Army, and of the Firemen’s Relief and Exempt Firemens’ associations.—For the sixth consecutive time Thomas Moran has been elected chief of the Caldwell fire department, with George Van ldistine and Sherman Courter, as his assistants.—An explosion of dynamite, a stick of which, purposely or accidentally is not known, was hidden among the coal used for heating the West Side firehouse at Atlantic City, wrecked the building. Firemen were buried in the debris and seriously hurt by the escaping steam and falling walls.—Fire Chief Anthony Frylinck will not be a candidate for re-election as chief of the Passaic fire department. He has served for one term.—The members of the Valley Hose company No. 1, of Belleville, recently presented Joseph F. Reid, an old member and office-holder at different times, with a fireman’s badge in gold, as a token of esteem and appreciation by the many services he has rendered to the company.—Paterson had a three-alarm $25,000 night fire on December 6. Schaube’s stable at 6 Bank street was destroyed, with several wagons and much fodder, feed and bedding. The forty horses were got out in safety; but the whole interior was gutted.

Chief Olaf Johnson, Superior, Wis.

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