New Orleans Fire Report

New Orleans Fire Report

Chief Engineer Louis Pujol, of New Orleans, in his annual report for 1914, presents the following information: There were 868 alarms, 756 of them for actual fires, 91 unnecessary and 21 false. The loss was $935,614 in property valued at $17,864,442 and insured for $9,022,596. With the installation of a motor pumping engine of 1,500 gallon capacity, a motorpropelled water tower, and chemical engine, the efficiency has been increased, especially in the commercial district. The chief recommends motor cars for assistant engineers, upto-date fire alarm box doors, to insure a better and quicker method of sending in alarms. To greatly reduce operating expenses and the enhancement of the efficiency of the department, Chief Pujol recommends the substitution of tractors for all horse-drawn apparatus in service. This means the elimination of horses, for it is understood that this recommendation will be favorably acted on as fast as the funds are available. Additional hydrants and greater water pressure in the commercial sections, to enable the extinguishment of fires by hose wagons without engines, is also recommended.

No posts to display