New Orleans’ Firemen

New Orleans’ Firemen

According to the Picayune, of New Orleans, La, that city has “a force better equipped, better disciplined and better treated than ever.” Chief Louis Pujol says:

“During the year the department responded to a total of 649 alarms, of which 586 were actual fires, 47 unnecessary alarms and 16 false alarms. The month in which the largest number of actual fires occurred was November, when there were 66, and, strange to say, in the shortest month of the year February, 1913, there were 61 actual fires. November had the largest number of alarms, there being 74, while October had the smallest number, there only being 30, of which 29 were actual fires. The department in its equipment and size of its force will, I am sure, compare favorably with any of the departments of cities of equal size in this country. The apparatus in service at this time consists of the following: Steam fire engines, 31 ; aerial hook and ladder trucks (horse drawn), 1; aerial book and ladder truck (motor drawn), 1; city service hook and ladder trucks, 9; auto hose wagons, 4 ; auto hose and chemical wagon, 1; auto chemical engine, 1 ; hose wagons (separate companies), 3; chemical engines, 4; combination chemical and hose wagon, 1; water tower, 1. Total, 57. Tn addition to’ this there are an automobile for the chief and two runabouts for the assistant engineers ot the first and second fire districts. The personnel of the department consists of the following: Chief engineer, 1; assistant engineers, 8; master mechanic, 1; assistant master mechanic, 1; men with steam engine companies, 251; men with hook and ladder companies, 88; men with hose companies, 56; men with chemical engine companies, 23; men with tower company, 4; total, 433.”

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