NEW PIPE-LINE AT CAMBRIDGE.

NEW PIPE-LINE AT CAMBRIDGE.

During 1906 Cambridge, Mass., has laid another section of the new pipe-line extending from Irving street in water, to River street, near Newton street in Waltham. The total length of this section, from the junction of the conduit built in 1905 to River street, is 15,280 ft. About 15,240 ft. are of concrete, 5 ft. 3 ins. in diameter, and the remaining 40 ft. are of 42-in. cast iron pipe, branches and gates, which are located at the connection with the present 30-in. cast iron main at River street. The total length of conduit now built from the inlet into Fresh pond to the junction of the 30in. main at River street is 27,405 ft. Of this total length. 26,740 ft. are of concrete, and the balance, of 30-in. and 42-in. cast iron pipe. The difference in elevation between the ends of the new section of the conduit at River street and at Irving street is 4.94 ft. The total length of the old conduit from Stony Brook dam to Fresh pond is eight and one-third miles. Three different portions of the new section will be under pressure. In two portions, one at Watertown Square, and the other in the private land near the Boston & Maine Railroad, and on Waltham street there will be a maximum head of about 18 ft. These two sections were reinforced with steel rods placed vertically, and spaced 12 ins. apart. The third pressure section is in Waltham street, near Rutland street. It was not considered necessary to reinforce this section. Great care was taken to make the inside of the conduit as smooth and tinht as possible, and, as parts of it were under pressure, the surface was plastered and brushed with neat cement mortar, thus making the conduit as tight as it could possibly be made. The cost of plastering the conduit increased the cost of the concrete about thirty-one cents per cu. yd., or twenty-three cents per line ft. The first excavation for the new section was begun on Arsenal street, Watertown, on May 21, last, and the first concrete was laid on May 25. The dimensions of the conduit are as follows: Five ft., 3 ins. inside diameter, 6 ins. in thickness on the bottom. 13 ins. on the sides at the springing line, and 7 ins. on top. These dimensions are the same as were used throughout the construction of the section built in 1905. On December 12, the water was turned on, and the conduit has been in use ever since. The cost of the first section was $245,708.35, not including a few land-damage claims not yet adjusted and one or two other claims. The result of laying this section is that, by even measurement, the line now yields 11,750,000 gals., as against a little more than 9,000,000 gals, in 1905. and the supply is now sufficient to furnish Cambridge with water up to 1916, at least probably to 1917. This, of course, includes also the 13,000,000 gals, furnishing Fresh pond. In 1896 the total consumption was 2,413,506,557; in 1906 it was 3,386.180,600 gals.—an increase of 972,674,043 gals.— about forty per cent. In 1896 the population was 81,643; in 1906 it was estimated at 991,934—all on the lines of pipe—an increase of 18,291, or twenty-two per cent.—2.2 per cent, per year. The estimated population on lines of pipe. Out of the 3,386,180,600 gals, pumped. 1,252,836,750 gals, passed through meters—making the percentage of metered water thirty-seven per cent. The average daily consumption was 9,277,207 gals.; per capita, 92.83; to each of the 15,062 taps 615 gals., at an expense of $20.33 per 1,000,000 gals, pumped figured on total maintenance operating expenses, or $64.25 when the interest on the bonds is taken into account. There are in use 128,12 miles of cast iron pipe, 40-in. 2-in„ of which 7,443 ft. were extended and 1,357 ft. renewed during 1906. Of 2-in. pipes, two miles are laid. Fifteen public hydrants were added to those already in use— making a total of 1,046 set; nineteen stop-gates were also added. The range of pressure on the mains is 55 to 60 lbs. The estimated number of services (galvanized wrought iron, tin-lined and lead-lined in 3/4-in to 8-in. pipe) in use is 117; number of meters added, eighty-two; number now in use, 2,935; percentage of services metered, nineteen. Edwin C. Brook is superintendent of the waterworks department.

Plan and Section Showing Tunnel Station, 85 Feet below Pennsylvania Station, Jersey City, and Tunnel Connection, below the Hudson, with Cortlandt Street Terminal, New York. Heavy Black Lines Show Extent of the Completed Work.

The new gravity system of Lynchburg, Va., is almost completed.

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