NEW PUMPING STATION AT PHILADELPHIA.

NEW PUMPING STATION AT PHILADELPHIA.

The new pumping station for the auxiliary fire service at Philadelphia, Pa., is a plain, massive steel and brick building located at Delaware avenue and Race street. Its dimensions are seventy-two feet by 140 Its inner walls are of white enameled brick There are installed in it nine gas units, or pumps, with the total capacity of 2,400-horsepower. Each weighs from twenty-four to thirty tons, and can be run at full speed in eighteen seconds. At a pressure of 300 pounds they can discharge 16,000,000 gallons a day almost noiselessly. The fuel is six parts of air to one of gas. The sparks for the engines are obtained with electricity, and there are font different and independent ways of getting a current. The pumps supply nine miles of pipe, and by their means there can be thrown on a burning building the contents of a tank eleven feet long, eleven feet wide, and eleven feet deep; in an hour, the contents of a tank sixty-six foot long, sixty-six feet wide, and sixty-six feet deep; in a day, the contents of a tank 200 feet long, 200 feet wide, and fifty-five feet deep —the pressure being sufficient to raise the water to the top of a column from 575 to 700 feet high.

Ithaca, N. Y., has recently purchased a combina tion chemical and hose wagon, in addition to the chemical engine and hose wagon it had before.

NEW PUMPING STATION AT PHILADELPHIA.

NEW PUMPING STATION AT PHILADELPHIA.

The pumping station of the new special fire main at Delaware avenue and Race street, Philadelphia will be finished by the end of the year. The machinery will consist of eight pumps, each having a capacity of 1,200 gallons a minute. Six pumps are now in working order. Special fire mains have been laid in the district bounded by Race and Walnut streets, and the Delaware river and Broad street, which will be supplied by the pumping station. At its test last week four two and one-inch streams were thrown 200 feet into the air, and four men. attempting to control the hose nozzles, were tossed about in a dangerous manner. One was struck by a hose coupling and hurled to the edge of the river bulkhead, so that he narrowly escaped going into the river. One of his ankles was broken, and a shoulder was dislocated. He was taken to the hospital. Another was badly cut on the head by the movements of the hose. The pressure called for in the contract for the construction of the station is 300 pounds. The highest pressure used in the tests was 225 pounds, vet this proved entirelv satisfactory, according to Chiefs Baxter and Hand, of the bureaus of fire and water respectively. One of the contractors said it was possible to obtain a pressure of 250 pounds twelve seconds after the fire alarm should be sounded. It will be necessary to devise some means by which the hose, when under high pressure, can be handled more safely than at present. When the hose broke away, the firemen regained control of it onlv by falling upon it with main force, and holding it down by the weight of their bodies.