New Pumping Station of Dallas.

New Pumping Station of Dallas.

At a cost of about $35,000 Dallas, Tex., has just completed, on Turtle creek, a most complete pumping station. On a foundation of reinforced concrete there is a superstructure of brick and stone. The whole building has the appearance of a well proportioned three-story structure. Inside there is open space except for the galleries and above there is the clear story that gives light and ventilation to the place. The boiler room is in the lower section of the building. Its walls resting on a sub-foundation of white rock. Above this the foundation of concrete rises to a foot above the grade level of earth. The concrete floor is at a level a little more than 2 feet below the grade line. The room is 44×69 1/2 feet inside measure. The south front of the boiler room has walls that rise 39 feet from the ground to the roof. There is a parapet three feet higher. For the big pumping engines there is a room with concrete floor 14 feet below the. level of the earth. The place is 64 1-3×101 1-3 feet in size. The walls there rise to a height of 43 feet with a parapet of three feet above the roof line. The boiler and engine rooms combined have a total length of 104 1-3 feet and the greatest length is 101 1-3 feet. In the boiler room are three new boilers of large capacity, either of them sufficient to run the 15,000,000-gallon pumping engine. They are relayed to make it possible to use two at a time and allow the other to be cleaned. Beneath the floor of the engine room are three suction wells, from which the pumps force the water into the city’s mains. These are supplied through the large concrete conduit, made of steel rein forced material. The conduits lead from the Turtle creek reservoir, more than 100 yards away, pass beneath the Katy and the Rock Island and the Cotton Belt tracks and past the old pumping station. The new station is 10 feet higher than the old, measuring at the floor level. The design was completed just before the flood of May, 1908, and was changed so that the floor would be four feet higher than the original design in order that the level might be above the crest of the flood, the highest ever recorded in the Trinity river at Dallas. In the engine room is the new pumping engine, with capacity of 16,000,000 gallons. It cost $64,000, installed and tested. There is now in process of erection one of the 10,000,000-gallon pumps that for twenty years has done service in the old pumping station. It was taken down and removed to the new place by city day labor and the outfit of the city’s well-boring rig, under the direction of Engineer Bassett. Some of the parts will be replaced and it is said the rebuilt engine will be as capable as a new one. The removal work cost about $869. Rebuilding will not cost a greater sum, it is stated. The walls of the concrete foundation are two feet thick. They stand on the hard rock, except for about twelve feet of the engine room west wall. Under this there was driven piling and railroad iron down to the rock and the concrete was made heavier there. Above the concrete the main walls of the structure are 18 inches thick to the roof line. Under the girders that support the roof, without necessity for inside posts, there are pilasters increasing the wall to 22 inches. For the entire length of the pumping engine room there is a tramway of steel, supported by steel posts, carrying the steel crane capable of conveying and lifting more than 20,000 pounds. This is independent of the building walls. Windows above the ground level are handled by means of chains and cranks so that separately or en bank they may be opened or closed to any desired extent. The roof of the building is of red tile, very attractive and declared to be practically indestructible from heat, cold or other natural causes. In the galleries, forming the second story within the engine room, are the offices of administration, the record rooms and the cleak and toilet rooms, with lavatories. Window sills and trimmings of the house are of white stone. The eaves and cornices are of artificial stone of terra-cotta. Largely on this plan the new station at White Rock is to be designed and erected. From the Turtle creek pumping station two lines of 24-inch main lead to the city, one to the west, the other to the east. From White Rock there will be 36-inch lines. To the Turtle creek station the water comes from Bachman through a concrete conduit, or from Record reservoir through the 36-inch and 44-inch conduit of wood and iron. White Rock will have no conduit, but will take the water immediately from the large new reservoir beside which it is to be erected.

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