New Standpipe at Youngstown

New Standpipe at Youngstown

A steel standpipe erected recently at Youngstown, O., is one hundred feet in diameter and fifty feet high, with a balcony three and a half feet wide around the top. It is one of the largest water works standpipes in this country. The standpipe is located in the southern part of the town, upon a high level some 190 feet above the business section. Formerly, during the summer months the water supply upon this high ground was reduced. The standpipe remedies this and it also gives additional supply and high pressure to the lower portions of the city when needed by the fire department. The cylinder consists of ten rings each five feet wide. The first or bottom ring is built of twelve plates, one and threeeighths inches thick and joined end to end by quintuple riveted butt joints. The plates gradually diminish in thickness as they approach the top plate, which is three-eighths inch thick. The rivets in the three bottom rings are one and one-eighth inches in diameter; in the fourth and fifth rings, one inch; in the sixth and seventh ring, seven-eighths and in the remaining three rings they are three-quarters. The bottom is of one-half inch plates with a six by six by one inch angle running around the outer edge, connecting the bottom to the first ring of the cylinder. There is a steel plate overflow pipe two feet in diameter that runs from the top of the standpipe down the outside, through the foundation, and thence connecting to a sewer. The inlet pipe, which is 20 inches in diameter, enters through the bottom. The foundation consists of a circular reinforced concrete ring, upon which the shell rests. This section of concrete is five feet wide at the top with a base of six feet six inches, being eight feet six inches deep. Within the ring there is a fill of granulated slag three feet deep, upon this is a floor of reinforced concrete twelve inches thick. The top of the floor and the outside ring are on the same level. The standnipe was erected by the. Chicago Bridge and Tron Company and the method of erection was as follows: The outfit consists of a stiff leg derrick, the bottom of the mast being guyed to the center of the bottom of the standpipe. These guy rods can plainly be seen in the picture on the front cover. The lower end of each stiff leg was mounted upon two wheels, sixteen inches in diameter, which ran upon a circular track of sixty-pound rails, curved to a radius of twentv-six feet. These rails were laid upon six-inch by six-inch by two-foot ties, which were laid loose upon the bottom of the standpipe. The seventy-five foot boom played between the two stiff legs. This created an upward pull on the mast and downward pressure on the end of the stiff legs. The entire derrick revolved around the mast support. By lowering the boom it would reach far enough over the edge of the standpipe for the fall line to reach a plate lying upon the ground, from where it was quickly raised to its proper position. After each ring was bolted up and ready to be riveted, a Bull Riveter with a 72-inch gap and 20-inch cylinder, exerting a pressure of 100 tons on rivet, was swung from the boom. The riveter was raised and lowered by a 10-ton chain hoist. All the ring plates were riveted up with this riveter.

THE YOUNGSTOWN, O. STANDPIPE IN PROCESS OF ERECTION

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