NEW WATER PUMP.

NEW WATER PUMP.

D. S. Lusadder, a beekeeper, living near Salina, Kan., has invented a water motor which he claims solves the problem of perpetual motion. The machine is made up of a series of pumps which force water into an elevated tank, from which it pours on to a water wheel, which turns and operates the pumps. The underlying principle of the invention consists in so balancing two columns of water in the pumps and constructing the pumping shaft in such a manner that the pumps are worked at an expense of very little power. In the Lusadder barn is a T-shaped cistern, whose upright portion is about twelve feet long, and horizontal portion about half that length. In the extreme top of the barn is a water tank. A series of twelve pumps extends from the cistern into the bam loft below the tank. These pumps are closed at the top with packing boxes, through which the pump shafts work. Parallel with each of these pumps and connected with it just above the cylinder is a flow-pipe, extending up into the tank. At the lower end of this pipe is a valve to hold the water which enters it. When the water rises in the pump it also rises in the fiow-pipe, and when the pipe shaft becomes full it is forced up the flow-pipe into the tank. To balance the water in the pump shaft with the excess in the flowpipe the inventor hangs weights on the end of the lever, which serves in the place of a pump-handle. A large pipe leads from the tank down to a small waterwheel, giving a direct fall of twenty feet. The wheel is placed in the right-angle section of the T-shaped cistern, so that the water may be again utilized by the pumps. Connected with the waterwheel by a series of cogwheels is the shaft which works the pumps. There is an eccentric on this shaft for each pump lever, but no two eccentrics are on a line. Each one is placed one-twelfth of the circumference of the shaft farther round than the one preceding it, so that the twelve extend round the shaft. By this arrangement six of the pumps have a downward motion, while the other six are moving upwards, and the entire system is perfectly balanced. This, combined with the balancing of the columns of water, admits of the working of the entire twelve pumps with a minimum power.

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