NEW WATER PUMPING SYSTEM FOR MINNEAPOLIS.

NEW WATER PUMPING SYSTEM FOR MINNEAPOLIS.

As a first step towards building a new water pumping system for Minneapolis, Minn., the water-works committee of that city recommends that a strip of land 175 feet wide—3.8 acres in all—running along the Anoka line from the east side of the river to Marshall street, northeast be purchased at a cost of $1,900, on which is to be built a new pumping station for which an appropriation of $50,000 has just been made. In all probability more land will be acquired, and the station will eventually become the central pumping station for the city.

The report of Messrs. J T. Fanning and William De La Barre, the engineers employed hy the city, shows that of the existing three pumping stations the lower two should he removed or abandoned because of the polluted condition of the water In their neighborhood—although they might he retained as auxiliary pumns for fire protection, were it not that when so employed they would fill the mains with contaminated wat_____r. The report suggests that the best of the pumping machinery which is now driven by water power in the lower stations might be removed to the new station and adapted for steam or electrical motive power. At the same time there would always be danger through concentrating all the city’s pumps in the one station The report recommends clarification of the water by building settling basins in two sections on the northeasterly side of the river and not far distant from the pipe lines now extending from the North Side pumping station to the reservoir—the total Storage capacity to be about 150,000 000 gallons of water. To meet the increasing consumption of water new pumps of at least 25 000,000 gallons daily capacity must be installed within ten years. The cost of two new sedimentation basins, exclusive of the price of land near the river would he approximately $430 000. If the water receives preper sedimentation before it is pumped, filtration may be postponed for several years to come; the pump injuries on account of grit will be reduced one-half; and a con siderable proportion of the bacteria will he removed. As to the pumping machinery: If the old pumps are removed it would he only as a temporary expedient to serve while new pumps are being installed.

The cost of removal of each pump (says the report) of 7 000.000 gallons daily capacity, including foundations, gears, and an electric motor to drive the same, would be about $7,000 exclusive of cost of repairs or renewal of parts of the pumps which have been in operation since 1883. and, if new steam engines and boilers were added the Whole cost would be about, $17,000 for each pump. New, first-class economical steam pumping cruines of the vertical type would cost $35 000 to $40,000. if of the same 7.O00.000-gallon capacity The cost of the two new basins adjoining the present reservoir for the sedimentation basins would be approximately $350,000.

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