NEW WATER SUPPLY OF CALDWELL.

NEW WATER SUPPLY OF CALDWELL.

Three years ago the search began for a new source of water supply for Caldwell, N. J. Essex Fells was selected and $20,000 in bonds was voted to build the plant. Louis L. Tribus, a New York engineer, reported on the cost, etc., as follows: A five year contract with the Essex Fells people to furnish water to Caldwell borough people, to be delivered at the borough line for fifteen cents per thousand gallons, or less: a standpipe to be erected at a suitable point to supply the highest houses within the borough limits. A oipe line is to be laid down and a standpipe to be built. Every street in the borough is not to be piped at once. The Essex Fells Water company has a small plant originally built about nine years ago, but recently moved farther down stream, so it is still in good order. It possesses two boilers, one forty-five and one eighty-five-horsepower, two pumps of 500,000 gallons combined capacity per twenty-four hours, and an air-compressor. Water from three driven wells and one shallower ducr well, situated near the old site of the pumping station, now flows to a receiving basin at the new site some forty to fifty feet lower than the wells. From this basin the water is pumped to an elevated tank holding, it is said, 75,000 gallons, and located at an elevation of 535 feet above sea-level. The present service required of this plant is very light, so that it could probably supply Caldwell with enough for domestic consumption for several years in addition to its own consumption; or until Caldwell’s houses are pretty generally connected with the public system. It will not, however, be sufficient for fire service, as the supply would be exhausted in a very short time. The watershed is only about half a square mile, and the wells could not be counted on for one good fire stream. The small streams in the neighborhood cannot be relied on to increase the supply for domestic purposes, as their water is more or less contaminated with sewage. In future increase, therefore, recourse must be had to wells driven at a considerable depth at some point near the Hatfield swamp, Westville, or Pine brook, between the last named place and Franklinville. In any case, pumping must be resorted to, and a gravity supply would be impossible except at an expense rendered prohibitory on account of distance.

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