New Water System at Vienna.

New Water System at Vienna.

FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING on December 28 gave a brief sketch of the opening of the new waterworks at Vienna. Following is a more detailed description of the system furnished by Consul General Charles Denby:

“In 1864, when Vienna numbered 600,000 inhabitants, the city council passed a resolution to supply the city with unobjectionable drinking water to be conducted by an aqueduct of noble proportions from the mountain springs Kaiserbrunnen and Sixtenstein on the Schneeberg and Rax Alps. With the steady increase of population and finally the inclusion of the suburbs of the city proper, now designated as Greater Vienna, an increase of the water supply became neces-, sary, and in 1892 decisive measures were taken to this end. Chief Engineer Kinzer investigated the springs, the work continuing until 1898. It was then decided to take the Salza river as source of supply. This branch of the River Enns, which runs from Maria-Zell to Gross-Reifiing, offered the advantage of having no industrial plants along its course and consequently was not touched by any waterway rights. The Salza runs along the base of the Hochschwab Alp. By measurements springs were found so bountiful, even in the depth of winter, that 200,000 cubic meters (1 cubic meter = 35.314 cubic feet) of water can be conducted daily to Vienna. After nearly 20 years the great work is almost completed, and on December 2, the sixty-second anniversary of Emperor Francis Joseph’s reign, the new aqueduct was, with appropriate ceremonies, dedicated to the use of the public. After the celebration, in which the Emperor took chief part by turning on water from the new aqueduct, for which purpose an exact model of one of the mountain springs had been set up in the great festal apartment of the city hall, the supply from the former aqueduct, in operation since 1873, was turned off in order to thoroughly cleanse the pipes. The new aqueduct, including side lines, is 120 miles long, the main line being 106, as compared to 56 miles of the old aqueduct, and 48 miles being through tunnels. In Mauer, near Vienna, connection is made by two lines of pipes with the Vienna distributing pipes. Of the new reservoirs planned two are now completed. According to computation, the cost of the new aqueduct already amounts to $15,000,000, of which nearly $2,235,000 was paid to laborers, and nearly $815,000 to inindemnify business men and landowners along the right of way. The contractors realized more than $3,850,000. The large manufacurers, especially dynamite and cement works and Austrian iron works, received more than $2,235,000. The acquisition of the territory containing the springs cost $467,000. For completion of the construction about $5,500,000 additional will be required, so that the new aqueduct will have cost over $18,000,000. as compared to $10,000,000 for the old one. The new aqueduct conducts 200,000 cubic meters of water to Vienna within 24 hours. The water is about 46 hours on the way and has a temperature of about 36° F. The springs are 2.00 to 2,300 feet above sea level, the Schreierklamm being 2,740 feet above it. The final chamber at Mauer is 1,072 feet above sea level. The greater part of the work was executed by the city building office (Stadtbaumat) and was done in the best possible manner.

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