NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

On the occasion of the funeral of Captain John Ryan, of engine company No. 80, who was killed on April 8 by the falling of a wall at the fire of the New York City Railway company’s powerhouse in Harlem, the body was taken from his home at 153 East 124th street to the Roman Catholic church of All Saints at Madison avenue and 129th street, where a solemn High Mass of Requiem was celebrated by the Rev. Father Crowley. The deceased captain lay in a coffin of solid polished oak and was covered with an American flag. The pallbearers were four captains of the department and four Grand Army men, Captain Ryan having been a veteran of the Civil war and a member of H. B. Claflin post, all of whose members turned out. The escort was made up of sixty firemen selected from the various engine companies in which the dead man had served. They were under the command of Captain Slattery. Grand Army services were also held, the members of the Claflin post accompanying the body to the grave in Calvary cemetery. The fire truck of engine company No. 14, on One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street, between Park and Lexington avenues, was drawn into the street, and the firemen of that company lined up as the funeral cortege passed on its way to the church. The number of floral offerings and the crowded church showed the respect in which the deceased captain was held. To many it seemed that, considering the manner of his death, the funeral should have been attended, if not by the fire commissioner, at least by some of the higher officers of the department.—At the recent fire in the Ragus Tea and Coffee company at Washington and Laight streets, Manhattan, the loss turned out to be $200,000, instead of only $70,000, as was at first stated. The fire was discovered at 4.30 p. m., the building, which was completely gutted, being closed for the Saturday afternoon. There was no watchman on the premises. Three alarms were turned in and two fireboats operated. The building was not sprinklered, but was of very solid brick construction, with double plank floors, and the elevators inclosed in brick shafts, with metalclad doors and rolling steel shutters at the en trances. The stairways were of wood, with wooden boxing. The wooden beams of the flooring rested on iron columns, which, like the gird ers were unprotected. The ceilings were chiefly of open finish; the partitions, of wood. For the protection of the area of some 10,000 ft. the on’y lire-appliances were fire buckets and standpipes. The fire probably started on the top floor, in the neighborhood of the coffee-roasters, which stood, with banked fires, on a fireproof floor. The fire had evidently been burning for some time before it was discovered, as, when the fire department arrived (and there was no delay) the two upper stories were fully ablaze and the flames had burst through the windows. The firemen’s work was so good as to prevent the blaze from spreading, although the men’s operations were somewhat handicapped by the repeated bursting of the fireboats’ hose under the heavy pressure.—Deputy Chief Charles H. Stone has been transferred from the command of the Forty-fourth battalion in the Brooklyn division of the city’s fire department to Manhattan.—There have recently been many transfers of captains and engineers and firemen in the Brooklyn division. With the exception of Deputy Chief Stone, however, none have been transferred to Manhattan.—On July 29, 1904, George E. Monsees, who had served as a member of hook and ladder company No. 5 in the city fire department, left it to become a policeman. On February 15, 1905, he was reinstated as a fourth-grade fireman—the grade he held when he left for the other calling. By a special ordei issued on April 8, 1901. the words of the order of reinstatement, dated February 10, 1903. were amended so as to read: “With service record as fourth-grade fireman of 282 days,” so that the date of advancement in grade shall be May 5 in each year, until the first grade is reached. A similar order, only the dates differing, has been, it is said, changed in the case of two third-grade firemen, each of whom left the department to become policemen, and returned to it, one after sixteen months’ absence; the other, after nine.—

Steam Automobile Wagon Built for South Africa by The American-La France Fire Engine Co.

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