NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

On the occasion of the funeral of Captain John Ryan, of engine company No. 80, who was killed on April 8 by the falling of a wall at the fire of the New York City Railway company’s powerhouse in Harlem, the body was taken from his home at 153 East 124th street to the Roman Catholic church of All Saints at Madison avenue and 129th street, where a solemn High Mass of Requiem was celebrated by the Rev. Father Crowley. The deceased captain lay in a coffin of solid polished oak and was covered with an American flag. The pallbearers were four captains of the department and four Grand Army men, Captain Ryan having been a veteran of the Civil war and a member of H. B. Claflin post, all of whose members turned out. The escort was made up of sixty firemen selected from the various engine companies in which the dead man had served. They were under the command of Captain Slattery. Grand Army services were also held, the members of the Claflin post accompanying the body to the grave in Calvary cemetery. The fire truck of engine company No. 14, on One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street, between Park and Lexington avenues, was drawn into the street, and the firemen of that company lined up as the funeral cortege passed on its way to the church. The number of floral offerings and the crowded church showed the respect in which the deceased captain was held. To many it seemed that, considering the manner of his death, the funeral should have been attended, if not by the fire commissioner, at least by some of the higher officers of the department.—At the recent fire in the Ragus Tea and Coffee company at Washington and Laight streets, Manhattan, the loss turned out to be $200,000, instead of only $70,000, as was at first stated. The fire was discovered at 4.30 p. m., the building, which was completely gutted, being closed for the Saturday afternoon. There was no watchman on the premises. Three alarms were turned in and two fireboats operated. The building was not sprinklered, but was of very solid brick construction, with double plank floors, and the elevators inclosed in brick shafts, with metalclad doors and rolling steel shutters at the en trances. The stairways were of wood, with wooden boxing. The wooden beams of the flooring rested on iron columns, which, like the gird ers were unprotected. The ceilings were chiefly of open finish; the partitions, of wood. For the protection of the area of some 10,000 ft. the on’y lire-appliances were fire buckets and standpipes. The fire probably started on the top floor, in the neighborhood of the coffee-roasters, which stood, with banked fires, on a fireproof floor. The fire had evidently been burning for some time before it was discovered, as, when the fire department arrived (and there was no delay) the two upper stories were fully ablaze and the flames had burst through the windows. The firemen’s work was so good as to prevent the blaze from spreading, although the men’s operations were somewhat handicapped by the repeated bursting of the fireboats’ hose under the heavy pressure.—Deputy Chief Charles H. Stone has been transferred from the command of the Forty-fourth battalion in the Brooklyn division of the city’s fire department to Manhattan.—There have recently been many transfers of captains and engineers and firemen in the Brooklyn division. With the exception of Deputy Chief Stone, however, none have been transferred to Manhattan.—On July 29, 1904, George E. Monsees, who had served as a member of hook and ladder company No. 5 in the city fire department, left it to become a policeman. On February 15, 1905, he was reinstated as a fourth-grade fireman—the grade he held when he left for the other calling. By a special ordei issued on April 8, 1901. the words of the order of reinstatement, dated February 10, 1903. were amended so as to read: “With service record as fourth-grade fireman of 282 days,” so that the date of advancement in grade shall be May 5 in each year, until the first grade is reached. A similar order, only the dates differing, has been, it is said, changed in the case of two third-grade firemen, each of whom left the department to become policemen, and returned to it, one after sixteen months’ absence; the other, after nine.—

Steam Automobile Wagon Built for South Africa by The American-La France Fire Engine Co.

NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

NEW YORK CITY FIRE NEWS.

On March 26, through the gross carelessness of a motorman, two men attached to Hook and Lader Truck No. 4, were severely injured while responding to an alarm of fire, when the car and truck were in collision at Forty-ninth street and Eighth avenue. The injured men are: James McGuire and Frank Neebuhr. Both were taken to Roosevelt hospital. The policeman of the traffic squad, who was watching the coming of the fire truck, when he saw the collision, took charge of a large automobile belonging to the New York Transportation company, which was passing. The two men hurt were placed in it and a rapid run made to the hospital. —Healy’s restaurant basement kitchen at Sixtysixth street and Amsterdam avenue, Manhattan, took fire the other night, an exhaust fan having drawn the flames to the upper floor. The headbroiler was the cause. He was broiling a lot of crabs when some grease caught fire and spread to the wall and took hold there just under the exhaust. He would not quit his job, however, but stayed at it till the flames upstairs were extinguished, with a loss of $500.—Battalion Thomas Larkin has been appointed to command the newly established twenty-fourth battalion, with headquarters at hook and ladder No. 28 house, 250 West 143d street, The Bronx.—During 1906 the New York fire department in Manhattan. The Bronx, and Richmond, attended 12,182 fires—581 more than in 1905. The loss was $5,679,295 on which was an insurance of $192,279,295. Of the alarms sent in, 1,375 were needless or false. In the borough of Brooklyn and Queens there were 3.851 fires—eighty more than in 1905 with 321 needless or false alarms. The property loss was $1.888.795—$218,764 less than in 1905.—Former Battalion Chief F. J. Snow has organised a lire department at Port Washington (L. I ), N. Y., of which he is also chief.—The pensions to be received by a New York city fireman on retiring must be decided by the fire commissioner.— During the past year 365 sub-cellar equipments were installed in buildings in this city.—The theatre inspection in New York has never been more effective than it is today, and the bureau of violations and auxiliary fire appliances has little, or no trouble in this line.—Two of the three new fireboats now being built for the city in Jersey City, will be launched on the 17th inst., and it is expected that the third will be ready within the year. The turbine system is being adopted in each and the dimensions of each arc identical. These are as follows: Length on deck, 131 ft.; on water line, 123 ft.; breadth of hull, 27 ft.; depth, 14 ft. The engines will be 850-horsepowcr and direct-acting, compound, with turbine-driven pumps of the new centrifugal pattern; capacity 10,000 gals, per minute. The decks will be flush like that of the New Yorker, except, of course, for the watertower aft, the pilothouse forward and the two turrets, which last will have nine 3j4-in. connections on each. The fireboat William L. Strong is being remodeled on the same lines, and the boat will be adapted to pass under the Harlem river bridge. Each borough in greater New York wili now have additional fireboat protection, and it is to be hoped that proper berthing facilities will be provided for all of the boats.— The firefighting force of the city now totals 3,805 men—distributed over 159 engine companies, fifty-five hook and ladder companies, one hose and three searchlight companies, fifteen double engine and seven double truck companies, four water towers, sixteen combination companies and 359 additional appointments.’—Five hundred parrots, the property of one woman, made such a screeching the other night as to arouse even the policemen, and a negro janitor to the consciousness of the fact that there was a fire on the first floor at 1,934 Broadway. Manhattan. These feathered fire-alarms with a number of canary birds were rescued alive.-— The firemen of Greater New York answered 12,182 alarms—averaging thirv-three a day, during 1906.