New York City’s BORO OF FIRE

New York City’s BORO OF FIRE

FIRE REPORTS

For 15 straight days, the 68 days of January 1985, Brooklyn, NY, firefighters battled one major in after another. As each incident was brought under control, firefi_____ felt that it would be the last in the exhaustive series. Units responded to a second alarm in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn January 16. The New York City Fire Department is normally busy during January, but by the 31st of the month, exhausted f hters had responded to more than fifty all-hands” fires, eight second alarms, seven thirds, a fourth, and a fifth, within the gh of Brooklyn and had dispatched units to assist in the control of the Times Square tenth alarm that crushed the quarters escue Company 1.

Firefighter ascends aerial to assist in opening the roof at this second-alarm fatal fire in Brooklyn’s East New York section.

Squad 1 members make a hurried exit from the rear of this tenement as the third and fourth floors suddenly flash over. This third-alarm in the Bedford Stuyvesant section momentarily trapped members operating on these floors, necessitating quick maneuvering of aerial equipment to t affect their removal.

days of January 1985, Brooklyn, NY, in after another. As each incident was felt that it would be the last in the January 16. The New York City Fire hters had responded to more than fifty gh of Brooklyn and had dispatched units escue Company 1.

All photos by Warren J. Fuchs, Bob Pressler, and Glenn D. Usdin

This fifth-alarm began in a 70 X 100-foot, five-story brick tenant factory. The fire spread to two adjacent factory buildings, making a 210 X 100-foot fire building. The fire then spread to the entire seventh floor of a fourth factory 300 X 70 feet at the rear. It later ignited the top floor of a 60 X 100-foot eight-story factory on exposure 4 side. “This is the toughest fire I’ve fought in my 31 years.” said New York’s John O’Rourke, chief of department.

Collapse of Rescue 1

Because of imminent collapse, apparatus were repositioned and heavy streams were redirected to protect overheating exposures.Intense heat caused unequal expansion of a 24-inch brick and concrete wall. As a result, it tumbled wave-like through the three floors of the quarters of New York City’s Rescue Company 1. The fast-spreading fire began in the cellar of a 200 X 100-foot mill constructed six-story commercial building. Efforts to contain the inferno and protect Rescue 1’s quarters were abandoned.Preliminary collapse of the cornice forecast the total collapse and resultant fire, heatbrand display

I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman . . . the occupation thrills us and stimulates us to deeds of daring, even at the supreme sacrifice. Such considerations may not strike the average mind, but they are sufficient to fill to the limit our ambition in life and to make us serve the general purpose of human society.” —Chief Edward F. Croker

New York City Fire Department June 9. 1899 to May 1. 1911

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