New York Gets Big Consignment of Motor Apparatus

New York Gets Big Consignment of Motor Apparatus

Delivery Made on Largest Single Order for Fire Apparatus Placed in Recent Years—20 Pumpers, 12 Aerial Trucks, 6 Hose Wagons and 8 Thawing Machines Included

Byran Thawing Machine at Work at Peru, Ind., Where It Was Called Into Emergency Service for Thawing an Outlet Sewer Catch Basin, During the Recent Cold Spell. This is the Type of Thawer Purchased by New York.

IN September of last year New York City awarded contracts for motor fire apparatus, which represented the largest single order for apparatus by the city in a decade.

It included the following:

Twenty 1,000-gallon pumpers, awarded to Mack Trucks, Inc., 25 Broadway, New York City.

Twelve 85-foot aerial ladder trucks to Four Wheel Drive Auto Company. Clintonville, Wis.

Six hose trucks to Walter Motor Truck Company, Inc., 1001 Irving Avenue, Ridgewood, Queens.

Fight, thawing machines, mounted on truck chassis, to General Motors Truck Company, Pontiac, Mich.

Prior to the awarding of contracts for motor apparatus, the city had purchased 173,000 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose, 12,500 feet of 1 1/2-inch hose and 20,000 feet of 3-inch. The purchase price for motor apparatus and hose totaled $643,225. Delivery has just been made of the motor apparatus.

Of particular interest are the specifications for the pumpers, which are of the centrifugal type.

To quote the specifications:

“It (each pump) shall be especially designed for the purpose intended, i.e.: for use in connection with fire apparatus, having in mind the wide variation in capacity and head required in meeting the specified tests. The arrangement of suction and discharge piping, valves, etc., required to accomplish the parallel and series operation shall be, so far as possible, integral with and form with the pump casing a harmonious and well designed assembly.

“The pump shall be of the multistage centrifugal type, having not less than four stages and not more than eight stages, the stages to be counted when operating in series. The pump shall be equipped with a positive and quick-acting vacuum pump of ample capacity, with control located near the driver’s seat, for use in exhausting the air from the pump and connected suction hose when drawing water from a level below the pump. The rotating parts of the main pump and vacuum pump shall be statically and dynamically balanced. All parts in contact with water shall, as far as practicable, be machined or finished smooth, so as to reduce the friction loss in the pump, piping, valves and passages to a minimum. Means shall be provided for taking up any unbalanced end thrust on the pump shaft.

“There shall be connected directly from the pump to turret pipe, a flexible Spencer connection and control valve, with a full 3-inch waterway; valve to have a long spindle, with a six-inch operating wheel to be on operating side of apparatus in line with body, spindle to be supported in guide sleeves and securely fastened.

Side View of One of Mack 1,000-Gal. Pumpers for New York Fire Department.

“The motor shall be a straight six cylinder, four cycle, heavy duty, of ample size to meet the road tests and pumping tests set forth.

“The contractor shall furnish a certified test diagram for the motor in each apparatus, showing the torque, horsepower, r.p.m., fuel consumption, mechanical efficiency, etc., outlet temperature of circulating water not to exceed 180° under any condition; and a test diagram for pumps showing r.p.m., efficiency and bead throughout operating range, capacity and head.

“Oil and gas consumption tests: Immediately after the brake horsepower tests, the engine shall be run for eight hours, developing continuously not less than 85 per cent of its maximum horsepower, as developed in the b.h.p. test. During this test, the consumption of gasoline and oil shall not exceed the following proportions :

“Gasoline—13.5 gallons per hour at 120 b.h.p.

“Oil—1.00 pint per hour at 120 b.h.p.

Rear View of One of the Mack 1,000-Gal. Pumpers for the New York Fire Department

“Pumping tests: All tests will be made while taking suction from the East or North Rivers with a maximum lift of 14 feet. The engine must not, in any case, when delivering rated capacity, operate at a speed greater than 1,600 r.p.m., or a piston speed greater than 1,800 feet per minute. The apparatus will be required to comply with the following tests. Volume and pressure shall be from any outlet or outlets.

“It shall deliver not less than 1,000 gallons of water per minute against a gauge discharge pressure of 160 lbs. per square inch at the pump and shall maintain this discharge for four hours continuously without showing evidence of overheating or other defects.

“It shall deliver not less than 500 gallons of water per minute against a gauge discharge pressure of 320 lbs. per square inch at the pump and shall maintain this discharge for four hours continuously without showing evidence of overheating or other defects.

“It shall deliver not less than 400 gallons of water per minute against a gauge discharge pressure of 400 pounds per square inch at the pump, and shall maintain this discharge continuously for three hours without showing evidence of overheating or other defects.

“It shall deliver not less than 250 gallons of water per minute against a gauge discharge pressure of 600 pounds per square inch at the pump and shall maintain this discharge for thirty minutes continuously without showing evidence of overheating or other defects.”

Aerial Ladders Specifications

The aerial ladders purchased are of 85-foot extension and consist of a tractor and semi-trailer carrying the ladders and other equipment. The tractor is of the four wheel drive type, with semi-trailer attached to the tractor by a fifth wheel. The apparatus is similar in general arrangement and construction to the aerial hook and ladder trucks last purchased by the New York Fire Department.

The thawing machines, three of which type were placed in service a vear ago in New York, consist of Byran Steam Corporation units, mounted on General Motors Trucks chassis. These units generate superheated steam at a temperature of approximately 750 degrees F., and the steam is delivered through metal hose to the point at which thawing operation is required. Oil is used as the fuel in the steam generator.

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