New York’s Future Water System,

New York’s Future Water System,

On January 1, 1893, the system of water supply and distribution within the limits of the city of New York will comprise over 710 miles of water mains. These are of cast iron with calked lead joints. They vary in internal diameter from 6 inches up to 48 inches, the latter being the largest size of distribution main. In the year 1893 it is proposed to greatly extend this service, and to lay 25 additional miles of pipe. Part of this amount represents the substitution of new for old pipe; a part represents entirely new lines. In the present system there are over 9000 fire hydrants and 7300 stop-cocks or valves. One of the latter, to be inserted in a 48 inch main in the upper part of the city, comprises a cast-iron shell, within which the gale moves up and down or horizontally, according to the way the valve is set. In the latter case the valve is in sections with faced joints, and the parts are fastened with bolts. Lead gaskets are introduced between the faces of the joint to supply packing.

Within the valve are the valve seats. These arc made of the best quality of composition metal and slope toward each other like a reversed wedge. The gate which closes the valve opening is in general terms a disk, somewhat wedge-shaped, so as to fit between the valve faces. At its upper end, assuming the valve to be set upright, the gate is eight inches thick. At its lower end it is four and one-half inches thick. These dimensions refer to its outer ring or zone. The inner portions are hollowed or cored out, so that the centre portion is only two and one-half inches. The valve was tested as to its tightness by a hydraulic pressure or head of two hundred pounds to the square inch. It weighs between eleven and twelve tons, and required a truck with three teams of horses 10 move it across the city from the river front, whore it had been delivered by lighter. It was built in Coxsackie, N. Y., by the Kennedy Valve Manufacturing Company.

No posts to display