NEW YORK STATE WATER COMMISSION.

NEW YORK STATE WATER COMMISSION.

That the New York State water commission cannot legally supervise the Ramapo Water company, has been decided by Attorney General Mayer, who says the commission has no authority or control over private water corporations, and that the procedure of acquiring additional sources of water supply by municipal corporations or water commissions of cities or villages does not apply to corporations and individuals. It was bis opinion, however, that the sources of supplies of such private corporations or persons are included within the scope of the investigation provided for by the act of the last legislature creating the State commission. The object of any report from that body is “to inform the legislature fully as to all water supplies within the State, whether now available, used or not. and, also, to inform that body of the present means of disposing of sewage, etc., to enable it to legislate intelligently upon the broad and important subject.”

NEW YORK STATE WATER COMMISSION.

NEW YORK STATE WATER COMMISSION.

Governor Higgins has nominated the followState water commission: President, H. H. Persons, East Aurora; Dr. Ernst J. Ledcrle, New York city; John A. Sleicher, New York city; Charles Davis, Kingston. Messrs. Persons and Davis are former State senators; Dr. Lederle is a graduate of Columbia University, and was health commissioner under Mayor Low—he is a strong reformer; Mr. Sleicher is president of the Judge company, and was supervisor of the City Record under Mayor Strong, and is a wellknowti journalist. Unlike the the members of the State gas commission (of whom is James R. Sheffield, a lawyer, a fire commissioner and president of the board of fire commissioners under Mayor Strong), who receive a salary of $6,000 a year, the members of the State water commission receive no salary, only their expenses for their five years’ tenure of office, although the governor is authorized to fix their compensation. They have been appointed under the terms of the Agnew bill. To this commission are to be submitted the plans of any city or town for extending its water supply, and this commission, after speedy hearing, is to determine whether these plans are justified by public necessity, are just and equitable to other communities affected, and whether they make just and equitable provision for the payment of damages. The findings of this commission are reviewable by certiorari proceedings.

THE MAYOR’S COMMISSION.

The favorite as the head of Mayor McClellan’s local water commission, the bill for which is now a law, seems to be Charles N. Chadwick, of Brooklyn, New York, formerly of the board of education, who headed a commission which investigated the Long Island water commission. Among other names more or less likely to fill the two other commissionerships are Abraham Abraham, of 800 St. Mark’s avenue, Brooklyn, and Lowell M. Palmer, of Clinton avenue, The Bronx. The mayor’s bill creates a commission of three members, who receive an annual salary of $12,000 and have power to create a staff of engineers, clerks and stenographers. This board is to proceed at once to certain water sources available for additional water supply for New York city, make plans and report to the board of estimate and apportionment, which may approve or modify the report. Provision is made for prompt action on these plans, the taking of the land and water necessary for the extension, the appointment of commissioners of appraisal to fix damages and the confirmation of the report of the commissioners of appraisal by the Supreme court, the appeal being to the Appellate division or the Special Term. Before this bill could be passed, the Wainwright and other bills obtained the following concessions: The people of Westchester county and Kingston may tap the additional supply and pay for it, at the same rate as citizens of New York city; in Ulster county no reservoir, other than that laid down as the Ashokan, on the report of the Burr-Freeman-Herring commission, shall be built; for Dutchess county the J. T. Smith law’s of last year, excluding New York city from certain streams, is not affected, and Suffolk county obtains a similar exception for the Burr law; the exclusion of New York city from water sources is secured in Putnam and northern Westchester counties, except at Cross river, Croton Falls and Rye lake; the protection of the interests liable to contingent damages, whose land or water is not actually taken is also guaranteed, and a number of provisions with reference to the prompt payment cf damages are made.