New York State Water Supply

New York State Water Supply

The Syracuse, N. Y., water supply system will be placed under supervision of the Public Service Commission, according to a bill introduced last week in both Houses of the Legislature. The proposed act applies to all water corporations and municipalities and amends the present law in many particulars. It would also bring the Syracuse Suburban Water Company under supervision of the commission. Under the act there can be no special rates granted to any consumers, and it is probable that the concessions that have been granted hospitals and other public, charitable and educational institutions in Syracuse would not be permitted. The water boards and authorities in first and second class cities may exercise such powers and jurisdiction in enforcing the laws of the state, and the orders and regulations of the commission of each district, as may be prescribed by statute or by the commission. Each commission, in its jurisdiction, is given powers of supervision, to investigate the quantity and quality of the supply, fix standards of measurement and purity, prescribe methods of keeping accounts, keep informed on practices and enter upon the properties for inspection. The bill requires each city and corporation to file a schedule of its rates.

New York State Water Supply.

New York State Water Supply.

The annual report of the New York State Water Supply Commission contains the following: “During the year the commission received 24 applications for authority to acquire additional sources of water supply, all of which were disposed of after hearings had been given. These applications represent a total investment of $850,000. not including the $25,000.000 distributing system for the new Catskill water supply in New York City, and they contemplate a new supply of water amounting to 9,000,000 gallons per day for the use of a population of 100,000 in various municipalities.” There is in the report a special discussion of the Westchester county water famine and a remedy is suggested. Attention is called to the prevalence of typhoid fever in the state which is attributed to the preventable pollution of water supplies and the enactment of an adequate statute to put a stop to it is urged. The commission says: “The direct expense and the indirect economic loss caused by each case of typhoid fever has been placed in one of the municipalities of the state where the disease has been of frequent occurrence at $500. The annual average number of cases in the state as shown by the table given has been 15.803. At the rate of $500 per each case, this means an annual loss of $7,901,500, or a total loss for the ten years of $79,015,000. This makes no account of the loss resulting from deaths or of the suffering and sorrow entailed, practically all of which might be avoided by the adequate protection of water supplies.” The commission makes the following recommendations in respect to water supplies: “1. That plans for obtaining additional water supplies, as well as additional sources of supply involving the acquisition of land should reouire approval. 2. That more effective means he provided for compelling the submission of plans. 3. That the jurisdiction of the commission he extended so as to cover constructive work after plans have been approved and its consent he required before a new plan is used. 4. That water storage plans for power purposes be required to be submitted for approval so far as the protection of water supply needs and the public safety may require. 5. That authority to regulate the service rendered and the rates charged bv water companies and municipalities be given to the commission. 6. That the commission be required to decide whether water supply plans make adequate provision for the future protection of the source of supply from contamination. 7. That the acquisition of private water companies by other private water companies, or by municipalities, or the consolidation of private water companies without the consent of the commission he prohibited. 8. That the consent of the commission be required for the acquisition of sources of water supply in cases where the supply is to be used wholly or partly in another state,”