NEW YORK WATER SUPPLY NOTES.

NEW YORK WATER SUPPLY NOTES.

(Special correspondence of FIRK AND WATER.)

The big East New York avenue main in the borough of Brooklyn has been shut down, which has caused great inconvenience in a number of districts, as no water can now be obtained above the second floor. In other sections the water is muddy and has to be boiled and strained before it is fit for use. The excuse that so much of the water is wasted by those living in the districts affected is not accepted as reason enough for shutting down the main. The Elatbush and East New’ York sections have experienced no shortage for the reason that these districts are supplied for the most part by local plants_ Deputy Commissioner Moffett has referred to Commissioner Dalton a suggestion from Chief Engineer Van Buren, of the Brooklyn department of water supply, that an appropriation be asked for immediately tor the purpose of putting down driven wells. An additional supply of about 7,000,000 gallons a day could thus be secured. He also recommends that the city purchase 25,000,000 gallons a day from any person or company having that amount of water for sale until existing conditions change for the better. Because of the shutting down of the East New York avenue main, he said, the supply of the Dyker Heights section has been almost entirely cut off. He suggests as a relief for the residents there that 5,000,000 gallons be purchased daily from the Blythebourne Water company for thirty days.— In the Bronx things are going from bad to worse. Hospitals and homes are suffering,and those who have to borrow water by the pailful are very indignant. Some are so poorly supplied that they have to use twice or even thrice the water they have already used for their ablutions and for washing dishes. As for scrubbing the house or doing laundry work, no one thinks of it. Some have had small gasolene pumping engines put in their basements at a cost of $36 or $-40, and pay a man so much a week to look after them. But there is no water to pump—and this,though they are paying $36 and more a year for water supply ! The proposed pumping station at Bedford Park will not help the lower portion of the Bronx. The only thing to be done seems to be to tap the Croton aqueduct near Washington bridge. Commissioner Dalton blames it all on the lack of rain, the frosty weather, and the superfluity of population ! — At last Wednesday’s meeting of the board of public improvements Deputy Comptroler Levy introduced a resolution asking the hydrographic branch of the United States Geological Survey to include the watershed of the GreaterNewYork in its territory. The hydrographists determine the amount of water occurring at given points in streams of water every day in the year. The resolution was referred to Commissioner Daltno_ Chief Croker reports that, on the occasion of the Wicke fire on First avenue aud Thirty-third street, at one time all the engines on First avenue and on all the side streets were getting no wuter at all. The pressure gauges registered from two to five inches of vacuum. Of the thirty engines at work only eight had pressure enough to meet the demand. “A number of companies had to abandon the hydrants for any other purpose than to feed the boilers (says Chief Croker’s report), and that was the limit of the supply.” This was evident even after the fire was under control and the bulk of the companies had gone home. M. L.

No posts to display