NEWARK FIRE NOTES.

NEWARK FIRE NOTES.

NEWARK, N. J., February 8, 1907.

George V. Denman was a member of the Newark, N. J., fire department for over forty-nine years. His ambition was to remain until fifty years of service had passed as a permanent member of the department, and then be retired. His sudden death prevented that ambition being realised. He was badly injured some years ago in a collision between truck No. 2 and a trolley car. On the day of his burial fifty-two firemen, one from each firehouse in the city, and all the members of truck company No. 6. paid their last respects to their former comrade. The funeral took place from his late home, 142 Wakeman avenue. The firemen, after viewing the body, formed in line, two abreast, and, headed by a fife and drum corps, escorted the hearse nearly two miles to the Irvington cemetery, passing three firehouses en route, when they were dismissed. The obsequies were in charge of the Firemen’s Mutual Benevolent association. The Rev. W. Franklin Rowley, pastor of the North Baptist church, officiated. The pallbearers were Captain Sooy, of engine companv No. 15; Fireman Donovan, of the same company; Firemen Gardner and Van Houten, of engine company No. 4, and Firemen Clark and Godber, of truck company No. 6. The first four were with Mr. Denman when he was connected with engine company No. 4. Many floral tributes were sent by the firemen of the city and personal friends of Mr. Denman. Among them was a pillow of white roses and white and pink carnations in the shape of the firemen’s Maltese cross, from the Firemen’s Mutual Benevolent association; a wreath standing on a pedestal made up of calls lilies, carnations and lilies of the valley, from truck company No. 6; a wreath of lilies of the valley and calla lilies, from the exempt firemen; and a large sheaf of wheat, from the firemen of engine company No. 4—Two houses, 412 and 414 Fifteenth avenue, Newark, were burning early in the morning, when all were in bed, except a plumber, who was thawing out the water pipes. The blaze shot tip between the two houses and spread to both. The police carried out six children, and were about to carry out two sick women from the top floor, when the firemen saved them the trouble by extinguishing the blaze.

NEWARK FIRE NOTES.

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NEWARK FIRE NOTES.

NEWARK, N. J., August 30, 1906.

The fire commissioners of this city have signed contracts for two additional second-size steam engines, one an Amoskeag and one a Metropolitan, and oe ordinary size; two combination chemical engines and hose wagons, one large size and one ordinary size, were also ordered, with steel bodies, and one combination wagon, with wooden body was likewise ordered, as well as 5.000 ft. of hose.—The awarding of contracts for tlie aerial truck was laid over on account of the high cost of bids.—The public building committee of the common council has agreed on the purchase of a site on Plane, William and Arlington streets for new quarters for an engine and other apparatus, at a cost of $38,300 for the site. A site for new quarters for truck No. 1 and water tower No. L has been selected at I afayette and Mulberry streets.—The fire insurance companies have made a considerable reduction in fire insurance rates. It is said to have been done voluntarily, and not in consequence of •he suit that is pending, brought by the city attornev, on the ground that the exchange operated in restraint of trade. The new rate will be effective in ibis city, Irvington, Belleville and uli of Hudson county, west of the Hackensack river, including Harrison, Kearny, Arlington and Fast Newark, which is the territory under the jurisdiction of the Newark Exchange. The new rates in this territory arc as folliws: Frame dwelling, twenty cents per $100 of insurance for one year, and fifty cents for three years, instead t*f twenty-four cents for one year, and sixty cents for three years, while for furniture it was twenty-eight cents for one year and seventy cents for three years. The contents will be insured at the same rate. On brick dwellings the new rate is sixteen cents for one year and forty cents for three years, the contents being the same. This is a slight advance over the old rates, amounting on an average to five cents; but it was found necessary to equalise the rates with those existing in other parts of the State on this class of risks. On frame private stables the new rate is thirty cents for one year and seventy-five cents for three years, with contents the same. The old rate was sixty cents for one year and one and a half per cent, of the amount of insurance for three years. On brick stables the new rate is twenty-four cents tor one year and sixty cents for three years, and contents the same. The former rates were forty cents for one year, and one per cent, for three years.

CHIEF J. J STRAPP, ST. PAUL. MINN.