News from the State of Georgia

News from the State of Georgia

Recent legislative enactment has given the mayor and council of Macon, Ga., full authority over the fire department and it is said that the administration intends to reinstate former Chief Lawrence Miller.

Chief John H. Monroe of the Savannah Fire Department was taken seriously ill at Asheville. N. C., where he was visiting Chief Duckett on his return from the Toronto convention. Chief Monroe is now in the Mission Hospital and the attending physician regards his condition as rather serious.

The new Breezy Hill reservoir for the Macon water service has been finished and the new mains connected. This will give the city a greatly increased supply of water. The reservoir is built of stone and concrete and is on the highest point of land in Macon.

A new three story business building in Louisville, Ga., was recently destroyed by fire, making the second big fire in that town in a few months. There are no water works and no fire protection. Defective electric wiring is supposed to have started the fire.

JOHN A. STULB

News from the State of Georgia

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News from the State of Georgia>

The city council of Macon intends to buy the old Fort Hawkins school site in East Macon for the purpose of erecting a fire station, as there is none in that section.

Members of the Macon Fire Department were undecided at their last meeting regarding the steps they should take to prevent themselves from being legislated out of the American Federation of Labor, by a pending bill. The section of the bill barring them from membership in any body that demands of its members obedience to an order to strike, for any cause, is a surprise to the men. It seeks to abolish the Civil Service Commission, but retains civil service rules under the management of the mayor and council.

The new Grand Theatre at Reynolds was completely destroyed by fire, after having been open only three days. The town was saved from greater disaster by the formation of a bucket brigade that passed water from wells to persons stationed on the roofs of buildings near the theatre and so prevented the fire from spreading. The fire was from the first thought to be incendiary, and soon after, a negro, giving the name of Sam Fagin, was arrested in Macon. He confessed to carrying a can of oil to the theatre and then returning to his home, afterward coming back and watching the fire. He implicated other negroes and some white men in the crime, and was rushed to Columbus for safe keeping, as a race riot was feared if he were taken back to Reynolds where feeling was strong in the matter.

JOHN A. STULB