NINETEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FIRE ENGINEERS.

NINETEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION

OF THE

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FIRE ENGINEERS.

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.,

August 11-14.

HEADQUARTERS, COOLEY’S HOTEL,

Following is the programme of business arranged for the convention at a meeting of the executive committee in April. The official order of each day’s proceedings has not yet been made public, but will, doubtless, be in effect as previously published in FIRE AND WATER.

  1. Report of the executive committee.
  2. Can buildings built of brick anti wood be made slowburning without most extra cost?
  3. P. J. CONNELL, Muskegon, Mich.

  4. Dangers of electric light wires, etc. – Essay.
  5. WM. UROEHY, Expert,

    New England Insurance Exchange, Boston, Mass.

  6. Defects in construction that firemen should especially lie acquainted with, the visible ami invisible,including elevator shafts.
  7. HENRY A. GOETZ, New Albany, Ind,

  8. Method of building in Germany, showing the result of proper architecture to prevent lircs in buildings, together with the method of building chimneys in that country.
  9. EDWARD WAl.THKR, City Engineer,

    Holyoke, Mass.

  10. Strength of Material.-Give some plain ideas in a condensed form, which will aid in determining the strength of buildings, especially the construction of piers, diameter and length of columns and trusses, both of wood or iron, which may be considered safe.
  11. K, S, NEWMAN and F. R. RICHMOND,

    Springfield, Mass.

  12. First aid.-Showing what to do in case of those rescued from smoke and insensible therefrom, amt presenting a method by which one can raise and carry an insensible |;erson down a ladder. Illustrated by practical demonstration by a corps of students from the international Young Men’s Christian Association Training School of Springfield, Mass. Lecture by Dr. Gulick, superintendent of the physical department.
  13. Should men of the life-saving corps, especially,and firemen in general, be instructed in the preceding subject, and should those who are found expert wear badges and be paid extra salaries as an incentive to perfect service in such emergency ?
  14. L. P. WEBBER, Host fin, Mass.

  15. Schools for instruction in lire departments.-Can their sphere ol usefulness be enlarged and extended ? Also, the best method of communicating with firemen at work in burning buildings. HUGH BONNER, New York.
  16. D. J. SWENTK, Chicago.

    L. P. WEBBER, Boston.

  17. Report of committee on couplings.

SUBJECTS FOR DISCUSSION.

  1. The best material and construction for floor of engine room in engine house.
  2. The advisability of rc-introducing in large cities a system of elevated look-outs or watch towers as an auxiliary to the fire alarm service, not for the purpose of ringing an alarm quickly discovering fire

The followiDg are the expcriments ⅛ the flow of water through hose and pipe which are proposed for exhibition during convention for those interested, by Chief Leshure and the Springfield (Mass.) Fire Department:

  1. ischar“l“ of different forms, gaugings by tank and weir,
  2. hriction loss in hose discharging different quantities of water-
    1. with one line 3-inch hose, 300 feet ;
    2. with one line 2J-inch hose, 300 feet ;
    3. with two lines 2-inch hose, 300 feet ; with three lines 2⅛-inch hose, 300 feet.
  3. Water hammer in hose and pipe. Illustrated.
  4. Pull-back in hose pipes under pressure, measured by scale.
  5. Exhibit, steam fire engine-
    1. rating by tank or weir ;
    2. result of contracted outlet at hydrant ;
    3. air chambers showing the compression of air in the same by the pressure of water.
  6. Perforated pipes ; exhibition of practicability of same.
  7. Cellar pipes, revolving and spray nozzles.
  8. Hose wagons v. hose reels. Exhibition of the merits and demerits ot each, by the fire department of Springfield, Mass.
ENGINE HOUSE AT WINCHESTER PARK, SPRINGFIELD, MASS.

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