Nipped in the Bud

Nipped in the Bud

Fire prevention inspectors in Alexandria, Va., report that a potential hazard to the people of their city has been nipped in the bud.

On the afternoon of March 14, two inspectors on a routine inspection of a florist shop discovered the use of flammable artificial flowers. Employees were occupied with making floral wreaths, table center-pieces and corsages with the flowers.

After examining the questionable stock, a match flame test was made on the outside of the building and this confirmed the flammability of the material. As soon as the inspectors recited the local ordinance forbidding sale of this material and demonstrated its potential hazard with the flame test, the merchants readily agreed that these flowers were “too hot to handle.” After notifying their fire prevention office and Chief Bernard J. Padgett, the neighboring jurisdictions of Washington, D. C., Arlington and Fairfax Counties were immediately advised of this hazardous situation, and working under mutual agreements, the materials were returned to the distributors for disposition.

A canvass of local shops revealed that preparation was being made especially for the Easter holiday and Mothers’ Day. It was later determined that some of the flowers were manufactured in this country and some imported from Japan.

Subsequently it was further determined that the flammable flowers can be stored indefinitely, thus creating the problem of redistribution at a later time.

NIPPED IN THE BUD.

NIPPED IN THE BUD.

A telegram from Pittsburgh, Pa., says Morris Keller, a clothing dealer, has been arrested on a charge of attempting to defraud his creditors. The suit was brought by Samuel Lewis & Co. of New York, who had furnished Keller with goods. At the hearing P. J. Keenan, his clerk, told a remarkable story of a plot to burn the store for the $3000 insurance, which, if it had been carried out, would have probably resulted in the loss of several lives. Keenan stated that Keller bought kerosene last Friday and ordered him to sprinkle the store and a number of cases of cotton batting with it. He was then to turn on the natural gas and apply the match to the kerosene. Keller left town for Salem, O., and Keenan was ordered to telegraph him after the building had been burned. Instead of doing this Keenan notified the agent of Lewis & Son, after which he notified Keller that everything was all right. When Keller came brck he was arrested for attempting to defraud his creditors. Keenan says if the plot had been carried out the lives of four persons living above the store would have been sacrificed, as it would have been almost impossible for them to escape. Keller is in jail.

ANOTHER PETROLEUM Explosion.—A London dispatch of November 21 says : “An explosion occurred at Bristol this morning on board the schooner United, which was laden with 310 barrels of petroleum. The vessel was wrecked and three men, who were at work on board, were killed. Burning oil floated on the water and caused great consternation among the vesselowners, who feared the flames would communicate to their own craft. No other damage, however, was done to shipping, the efforts to prevent the burning oil from reaching the vessels proving successful. The force of the explosion was so great as to wreck the windows in the buildings near the scene of the explosion.”