North Carolina Fire Losses

North Carolina Fire Losses

According to Insurance Commissioner Stacev M. Wade of the state insurance department of North Carolina, the losses for December show a total of $1,118 892, against $1,026,000 in 1920. Up to December 24, according to Mr. Wade, the total losses were only $180,000. On that day the larger losses began at Wilson with $360,000 and continued to the end of the year with an average of $100 000. For the state at large, he declares, the record was excellent. Never before have so few fires or injuries been reported in connection with Christmas festivities, including New Year’s. This is shown by the figures of the fire loss, with only $261,607 exclusive of the nine big fires, with loss aggregating $857,285. These were at Kernersville, Roseboro, Charlotte. Wilson, Scott, High Point. Rockingham, Louisburg and Newbern. Commissioner Wade also gives the total for 1921 as $7,463,207. This is nearly 25 per cent, increase over 1920, when the losses for the state aggregated $6,032,000.

North Carolina Fire Losses

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North Carolina Fire Losses

The fire losses in North Carolina for October, according to Commissioner Stacey Wade of the state insurance department, show a total of $684,729 and bring the loss for the year up to November 1 to $5,774,058. According to the commissioner, the number of fires for October was 236, the loss on 218 of these being $148,048, leaving the remainder $536,641 as a result of eighteen fires in all.

The reported origin of these 236 fires tells the usual tale of carelessness or negligence of owners or tenants as follows: Sparks on shingle roofs and bad flues, 90; unknown, 38; exposure, 28; smoking and matches, 16; lamp and oil stove explosion, 12; burning trash and sparks in leaves in gutter, 18; hot ashes, 9; overhot stove or furnace, 8; defective wiring and short circuit, 11; machinery friction spark, 6; suspicious, 6; incendiary, 2; electric iron, 1.

The fire loss for November, Commisioner Wade states, will show improvement over September and October in the number of fires as well as extent of loss. While accurate statistics cannot yet be made, enough is known at the close of November from reports now on file to safely estimate not exceeding a loss of $430,000, of which over half is the result of three school and college fires at Grove Park. near Asheville, Davison College and Chapel Hill University Inn.

Two drivers of the New York fire department, George Martin, driver for Deputy Chief George Ross, and Hugh McGrogan, driver for Battalion Chief Flanagan, made two remarkable rescues in a fire on December 9. Martin straddled a small window and grasping a woman tenant who was calling for help from an adjoining window swung her like a pendulum until she was in range of McGrogan’s hands, the latter lying on a gas stove and being held from falling by two of the tenants who grasped his legs. A man weighing two hundred pounds was rescued in the same way by the two firemen.