Northampton Water Department

Northampton Water Department

The Board of Water Commissioners of Northampton, Mass., consists of Frederick C. Feiker, Sibley H. Kevs, Charles N. Clark, Howard W. Hosford, Charles W. Kinney and Warren M. King. Luther C. Wright is superintendent and Albert H. Tillson is supervisor. In the forty-fifth annual report of the water department, being for the year ending November 30, 1915, the commissioners say: For the first time since built in 1900 the Mountain street has, and also the others have been practically full of water the whole season. A great deal of work has been done cleaning, fencing and putting in good condition the property.owned by the city for the protection and purity of the water supply. We are studying the subject of additional storage for the future needs of the city. A large amount of pipe has been replaced by larger pipe and new extensions made in many streets. The treasurer’s report shows the following: Dr., 1914. November 30, to balance in hands of treasurer. $16,927.49; 1915, December 1, to cash receipts during the year: For water (schedule), $39,026.38; for water (meter), $16,550.86; total. $55,577.24; for labor. $836.60; for stock, $1,363.86; for incidentals, $998.20; for interest, $446.75; total, $59,222.65; grand total, $76,150.14. Cr., rent, $879; bond interest, $3,360; bonds, $8,000; taxes, $272.89; stock materials, etc., $23,983.01; pay rolls, labor, etc.. $17,021.98; freight. $1,647.33; incidentals, $2,439.31; total, $57,603.52: balance to new account, $18,546.62; grand total, $76,150.14. Superintendent Luther C. Wright in his report says the cost of construction from the annual report of 1914 was $902,994.58, and the additional in 1915 was $24,003.26, making a total of $926,999.84. Twentyseven additional hydrants were installed on the pipe lines, making the full number in use 492. The total number of new services from December 1, 1914, to November 30, 1915, was 69. Relative to a pitometer test of water consumption, Superintendent Wright’s report says: Owing to the extreme dryness of the past three or four years, it became evident to the department during the summer of 1914 that some means of conserving the water supply should be looked into, and as no definite knowledge had ever been obtained as to the exact amount of water consumed daily by the city or the amount of water that was wasted through leaky faucets, piping, etc., it was decided to make a series of tests. A contract was entered into with the Pitometer Company of New York for making such a test. This was made between the dates of November 11 and December 31, 1914, and April 15 and 30 of 1915, during which period no lawn hose was in use, so that the results obtained gave the consumption at a time of year when the same was at its lowest rate. Below are a few facts and figures taken from the Pitometer Company’s report: Average daily consumption for city, November, 1914, 2,871,000 gallons; minimum night rate for city, November, 1914, 1,889,000 gallons; night rate per cent, of day rate, November, 1914, 66 per cent. This showed a very excessive night flow and an inspector was put on to make a house to house inspection for leaky fixtures with the following results; Average daily consumption, April, 1915, 2,662,646 gallons; minimum night rate, April, 1915, 1,560,000 gallons; night rate, per cent, of day rate, 58 per cent.; reduction in night consumption, 329,000 gallons. The report says: At the time of the second test in April, 1915, only about 50 per cent, of the services had been inspected, so it is safe to assume that the night rate has been reduced to approximately 1,000,000 gallons, but even at this figure it is exceedingly large and it behooves the citizens to co-operate with the department inspectors to stop all unnecessary use and waste of water, and if this waste cannot be stopped by rigid inspection, and by the observance of the rules of the department, other means will have to be adopted. Considerable work has been done at the reservoirs this season by cleaning on the watershed and along the brooks and building fences. The supply of water for the last year has been ample. The streams have maintained their usual flow after several dry seasons, and the quality’ has been good. Samples of water are forwarded to Boston every two months and the result of these analyses are kept on file in the office for public inspection. An analysis of the water taken from the Mountain street reservoir October 25, 1915, shows the following results, the figures representing number of parts in 100,000: Color, .05; residue on evaporation, 3.65; free ammonia, .0008; albuminoid, .0126; chlorine, .16; hardness, .18; iron, .009.

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