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NEWARK, N. J., May 4, 1907.

As to householders, so to the Newark firemen the beginning of May has proved a time for pulling up their stakes and moving. The fire board ordered many transfers and these have gone into effect: Battalion Chief Matthew P. D. McDermit went to truck 5 from engine 1, and will assume charge of the fire district laid out by the hoard. Battalion Chief Paul J. Moore took charge of his district, going to truck 2 from truck j. Battalion Chief Robert Morgan remains at engine 14. Horses and wagons have been provided by the commissioners for the new chiefs. Captain George F. Lynch went to engine 14 from truck 7. and Captain Charles A. Storch from engine 6 to truck 1, succeeding Captain William Exall. Lieutenant Jacob F. Sotzin went from engine 10 to engine 6. These were promoted by the Fire Board at last week’s meeting. In connection with Captain Exall’s transfer the men of his old command presented to him the night before he left them a fire hat properly inscribed. Lieutenant Edward A. Crossman acted as spokesman and the captain thanked the men for the gift and recommended his successor to their regard. Refreshments were then served.—At the annual meeting of the Freehold fire department, C. B. Barkalow and Edward C. Cushion were re-elected president and vicepresident respectively. Edward Simonson was elected chief, succeeding Joseph H, Clancy, and Harry F. Soden was advanced from second to first assistant chief. Herbert R. Dix, who is district freight-agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad company, won a three-cornered fight for second assistant chief. He was also elected secretary and treasurer of the department.—Woodbury, which is on the lookout for a new source of water supply, has had a test artesian well bored on the Matlock lot. which it may yet get as a site for a new water plant. If there is a good flow from this test well, more wells will be drilled. The prospects for an abundant How are bright, if at least the well is found to be the same vein as that which supplies Cantden with water.—The water committee of the blast Orange city council will arrange with the State board of forestry to take charge of forestry work on the OiO acres of land on the grounds of the municipal waterworks plant in Millhurn. It is intended to cut out the old wood and sell it. New plantings will then be made. The task of patroling the forests, so as to guard against fire will be undertaken by the city. The old Belleville waterworks plant, which for years has been abandoned, may be utilised by Newark as an electriclighting station. Or a turbine plant may be installed for the same purpose in the city’s watershed at the Macopin outlet. In any case, nothing can be done in the matter till a special election has been held to decide on a bond issue of $1,000,000 the estimated cost.—Burlington is about to contract for a filter plant of 3,000,000 gals, in twenty-four hours.—A pipe-line is to be constructed by the Middlesex Water company from Ash brook to Roosevelt and Carteret, near Elisabeth. The fire budget of Newark calls for an appropriation of $565,784.55—an increase of $98,784.55 over that of the preceding year. New apparatus and the extension of the fire-alarm system will take $37,000. The erection of several new firehouses and the purchase of a very much needed fireboat for the protection of the Passaic river front are also urged by Chief Kiersted.— The fire commissioners of Newark have presented their annual budget for the current year to the common council. The total amount asked for is $565,784 —a large increase over last year, iluc to additional pay of the firemen and extra companies ill service. This amount will have to be increased still further in the late fall when engine company No. 22 goes into service. The budget calls for $11,000 for two additional steam engines, $6,600 for three combination chemical engines and hose wagons. $9,000 for horses and $9,000 for extension of the fire-alarm system. Accompanying the budget were the following general recommendations from Chief Kiersted: One new enginehouse in the extreme northern section of the city: one in the recently annexed section, formerly Vailsburg; one at Sixth avenue and Cutler street; and one near the junction of Elm and Van Bttren streets. Additional truckhouses are desired at the junction of Bowery and Ferry streets; South Orange avenue and Twelfth street and Bergen street and Hawthorne avenue. A fireboat is also recommended for the Passaic river.—At the last regular meeting of the board, a number of additional men were appointed from the civil service list, in addition to those who went on duty on May 1.—South Plainfield will organise a fire department.—A. S. Flagg has been nominated as first assistant chief of the Westfield department, and Wm. Kelly as second.— Milburn, N. J., claims to have the oldest firemen in the State in the person of Roger Marshall, who has just celebrated his 76th birthday. Mr. Marshall has been connected with the Milburn fire department since its organisation and drives the hose wagon. He intends taking an active part in Milburn’s semi-centennial celebration on April 13.

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Correspondence of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING. At Newark, as one of the salvage corps wagons was responding to an alarm of fire at Mulberry and Lafayette streets, it came into collision with a trolley car. The four salvage men were thrown out and sustained severe cuts and bruises. The motorman of the trolley car was so badly cut and otherwise injured that he had to be taken to the hospital. He may lose the sight of one eye. The car. it is said, gave no warning of its approach, and only the quickness of the driver of the salvage wagon saved a head-on collision. One of the horses was so badly injured that it is doubtful whether it can ever again be used by the salvagecorps. — Bloomfield firemen threaten to resign, unless the municipal authorities give them the $12 salary they claim to be due to them. Fiftysix companies are entitled to it, having performed the seventy-five per cent, of duty required of them during the year. The remaining forty-four who threaten to quit claim that, in most cases, sickness prevented them from attending fires, and, on that account, the annual allowance should not be withheld from them. The council has determined to pay only the fifty who hvae complied with the terms of the law.—The Montclair Water company has informed the councilmen that its meter at the intake in Watclumg avenue is registering correctly the amount of water used by Bloomfield, and that the money held back by the town should be paid. Councilman Green said he was not so sure that the test was an accurate one. as the water had been taken from a tank and forced through the meter. Mr. Green claimed that a meter installed by Bloomfield last August, to test whether the water metered by the water comnany was being measured correctly, showed a difference of 88,500 cu. ft., or 664,425 gals. For the week ending November 19 last, the difference between the two meters was 39,000 cu. ft., or 292,500 gals, which was evidence enough, the water committee said, that the water company had repaired its meter. The matter was referred to the law committee.—The Springfield fire department has just BEEN organised, and has purchased from the Chelsea HMook and Ladder compam of Nyack, N. Y., a truck fitted with extension and scaling ladders, poles, axes, crowbars, signal lamps, etc. It is very light, and can be drawn by four men.—W. G. Beckham, a New York lawyer, who resides in Mountainside borough, adjoining Westfield, has offered the Westfield fire department a $250 horse as a Christmas present, to take the place of “Hugh Jingles,” the veteran horse of the department, which was lent by him several years ago and is now unfit for service. The fire committee has been impowered to accept Mr. Peckham s present.