Notes on Filtration.

Notes on Filtration.

In view of the unsatisfactory condition of the water at Bay City, Mich., the state health officials have recommended that the city erect a filtration plant. It is estimated that the initial cost will be $200,000 before it is definitely ascertained that it is impossible to obtain a pure water supply with the present system.

“The city should adopt this recommendation only as a last resort in its fight for pure water,” said Superintendent E. L. Dunbar. “I believe we can reach a permanent supply by extending the intake pipes further into the bay, where there is a freer and steadier current. This was suggested by former Mayor Evans’ citizens’ committee, which sought to solve the pure water problem, but was dropped when 1 estimated that such extensions would approximate $300,000.”

Mr. Dunbar estimates that a new intake in the course he has outlined, serving both stations, would cost approximately $200,000. A central station would, he estimates, approximate $300,000. Thus the entire outlay for the suggested improvements would be a half million dollars. With a filtration plant which, by the way, Mr. Dunbar believes unnecessary, the cost would approximate $750,000.

Chief Engineer Rienle, of the waterworks at Wilmington, Del., reports unusual efficient work by the filter plant. Each of the six beds was given one washing during January, the washing machine being in active service, but approximately 36 hours in the period of 30 days and this record is the best so far established. The biological efficiency of the plant has been 99 per cent. The collection of water rents for January amounted to $165,455.36, of about $5,000 more than for the corresponding period last year.

Notes on Filtration.

Notes on Filtration.

The Toledo, Ohio, Blade says that Cleveland must eventually construct a purification plant, and it congratulates the city of Toledo upon securing pure water in “the cheapest and most satisfactory way”—through filtration. The Blade says that if a pipe line had been constructed to the lake, Toledo might have had a few years of comparative freedom from contamination, but that with sewage flowing constantly from the Detroit and Maumee rivers it was only a question of time until a purification plant would have become necessary. “A filtration system does far more than filter water,” says the Blade. “It really alters the character of the water so that the chemical constitutents. as differentiated from material merely in solution, are different at the point of outflow than they are at the intake.”

Water filters to guard the health of the school children of Kansas City, Mo., will be installed in all the schools. The board of education has taken this long delayed action. It was recommended that the matter be referred to the supply committee, and that prices be available to the board at the next regular meeting.

A filtering plant to prevent the pollution of the Schuylkill river by the dye drained from the Champion Silk Company’s plant, at Pottstown. Pa., has been approved by state fish commission representatives.

Dr. Fronczak, of Buffalo, N. Y., will recommend the installation of filters in the public schools. A test is to be made of a number of filters, and the one making the best showing will be recommended. “The water at the schools must be filtered,” said the commissioner. “We are asking the housewives of the city to boil the w’ater, which is not fit for consumption at certain periods of the year, and yet the children at the schools are asked to drink the water as it comes from the tap.”