October Fire Loss

October Fire Loss

Fire losses in the United States during October were $22,621,000, according to the estimate given out by the National Board of Fire Underwriters. The estimate is based upon incurred losses reported by member companies of the National Board, plus an allowance for uninsured and unreported losses.

Losses from fire continue to show a decline from those reported a year ago. The October total shows a drop of twenty-seven per cent from that of the same month last year. However, the October, 1941, loss was exceptionally high because of the Fall River rubber conflagration. The October, 1942, loss was eleven per cent higher than that of September, 1942.

October Fire Loss

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October Fire Loss

October is signalized as having the largest total of fire losses of any month either of this year or of the two years preceding. These losses reach the enormous sum of $75,472,300, as compared with $26,384,450 in 1917 and $17,701,375 in 1916. Of course, this fact is partly due to two great conflagrations—one the Morgan shell works and the other the terrible forest fires that raged in Minnesota and Wisconsin. The former entailed a $20,000,000 loss, while the latter figures were estimated at over $35,000,000. Other large fires of the month included one of $5,000,000, one of $1,800,000, one of $710,000, one each of $500,000, $475,000, $375,000, $335,000, and one of $300,000. There were a total of 21 fires with a property loss of $200,000 and over; 21, $100,000 to $200,000 ; 5, $75,000 to $100,000; 22, $50,000 to $75,000; 17, $30,000 to $50,000; 28, $20,000 to $30,000; and 50, $10,000 to $20,000. The losses for the preceding ten months of this year were $288,942,885. This compares with the same period of the past two years as follows: 1917, $220,714,815, and 1916, $189,481,220.