OLD NEW YORK AND ITS WATER CONDITIONS.

OLD NEW YORK AND ITS WATER CONDITIONS.

The present source of water supply for Manhattan and the Bronx, New York, as is well known, is incapable of further extension. It comprises the basin of the Croton river and its tributaries north of the Croton dam, the Bronx river and its tributaries north of the Kensico dam, and part of the basin of the Bryam and the Wampus rivers. In the Croton watershed there are approximately 338 square miles, and in the Bronx, Bryant and Wampus watersheds, twenty-two square miles—making a total of 360 square miles. When the new Croton dam is completed, an area of about twenty-five square miles will be added. The storage capacity of all reservoirs in the Croton watershed is 41,000.000,000 gallons; of the Bronx and Bryam combined, 3,500,000,000. With an average daily withdrawal of nearly 300,000,000 gallons, this reserve would soon be exhausted in case prolonged drought diminished the renewal.

INTERIOR FILTER HOUSE, JOPLIN, MO.

The new nine-ton compressor has been installed in the pumping station of the Atlantic City, N. J., water department, close to where are the newly completed artesian wells for the city’s supply.

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