ONE EFFECT OF IMPROVEMENTS IN MUNICIPAL WATER WORKS.

ONE EFFECT OF IMPROVEMENTS IN MUNICIPAL WATER WORKS.

A decrease of seven per cent, in quantity and fifteen per cent, in value of the mineral water bottled and sold in 1913, compared with 1913, is believed by R. B. Dole, of the United States Geological Survey, to be due to a decrease in demand consequent on improvements in municipal water works. Nearly 58,000,000 gallons of mineral water was bottled

and sold last year and it was valued at over $5,000,000 and the Geological Survey Bulletin states that detailed examinations of the statistics for the last few years shows that the installation of municipal purification plants in several large cities has been followed by a marked decrease in the sale of spring waters in the immediate vicinity, and that doubtless improvement in the quality of water supplies in smaller municipalities throughout the country has similarly affected the mineral water business and has contributed to the present lowered production. There is also a tendency toward a lower price, which is caused by decreased sales of high-priced medicinal waters and increased sales of low-priced table waters. The general tendency toward a decline in price is doubtless due to the demand for good, pure, potable bottled waters at moderate cost in place erf the former demand for waters reputed to possess exceptional curative properties and therefore commanding fancy prices. In 1913 the State of New York led in the number of commercial springs, the quantity of water sold, and the value of table water, and nearly tied Wisconsin for first place in total value. Indiana led in the value of medicinal water sold. New York and Wisconsin reported sales of more than 5,000,000 gallons of mineral water each. In Wisconsin, New York, and California the total value of the mineral water output exceeded $500,000.

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