OPPOSITION TO THE NEW YORK CITY WATER BILL.

OPPOSITION TO THE NEW YORK CITY WATER BILL.

The consulting engineer of the State Water Commission, Mr. Myron S. Falk, suggests some material variations from the plan of the city commission for drawing additional water supply exelusively from sources in the Catskill region, lie strongly advocates the repeal of the exclusion from Nassau, Suffolk and Dutchess counties, from which a large part of the needed supply could be obtained without local injury that could not be fully compensated. Mr. Falk calculates that the equivalent of nio.ooo.ooo gallons a day could he derived from Nassau and Suffolk counties for the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and Richmond, 150,000.000 from the Ten-Mile river, which rises in Connecticut, and 150,000,000 from Dutchess county. In addition to this, lie would provide for the Ashokan reservoir in the Esoptis watershed, b it would exclude for the present the other three in Ulster county as unnecessary and adding greatly to the cost. He would construct from the Ashokan reservoir an aqueduct capable of carrying 500,000,000 gallons a day, so designed that connection could be made with the Dutchess county sources, and, also, if neccessary in the future, with the other Catskill sources, the Rondout. Catskill and Schoharie streams. He also considers further development of the Croton systern to be possible. 1 le regards the estimate of the city commission of the cost of the scheme as many millions too low. He estimates that the population of New York in 1025 will be 6,320,000, and that by the adoption of proper precautions, there will lie water enough to last till 1912, even supposing that dry years intervene. He calls attention to the absence of records in Manhattan and The Bronx showing the quantities of water consumed, and that there are apparenty no meters on the delivery mains supplying these boroughs, Mr. Falk says that, “until accurate measurements are taken to determine these deliveries of water, no exact knowledge of the amount of water wasted or consumed in those boroughs can be had.” Mr. Falk says that the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and Richmond require an additional supply, but believes the plans filed will fail to furnish the desired relief. The supply for these boroughs, he says, is obtained mainly from underground sources, and an actual stoppage of the supply is practically impossible, and in times of drought the situation will be less serious than in Manhattan and the Bronx.

TANK AT HEIGHT OF 65 FEET, SHOWING STEEL REINFORCEMENT.NEW WELL AT PUMPING STATION, 25 FEET DEEP, 40 FEET IN DIAMETER AT ATTLEBORO.
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