Pacific Coast Fire News

Pacific Coast Fire News

(From our Regular Correspondent.)

The 26th annual convention of the Pacific Coast Association of hire Chiefs will he held on September 15 to 18, 1919, at Portland, Ore.

Captain James F. Maloney, of Truck Co. No. 1, Seattle, which is the big aerial truck at headquarters was instantly killed on the night of July 4th by an unexploded bomb which dropped on his head. He was off duty and standing alongside of his automobile in which his wife was seated. Both were watching a fire-works display given on the roof of a newspaper office. The funeral on July 8th was very largely attended as the Captain was one of the most popular men in the department.

The city of Seattle, through the Board of Public Works, awarded the fire apparatus order to the Seagrave Company. It included two 1,000 gallon pumping engines, two 800 gallon pumping engines and one 75-foot aerial truck. The bids were received Friday the 11th and awarded yesterday.

PACIFIC COAST FIRE NEWS.

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PACIFIC COAST FIRE NEWS.

(Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.)

Chief D. Guthrie, of Rossland, one of the mining centres of British Columbia, submitted a detailed report of the progress of the excellent fire department of that city during the year, which kept down the losses to $10,115, with thirty-three alarms. The expenses of the department amounted to $13.00. The direct pressure at the hydrants ranges from fifty to 205 pounds.—The year closed with a very disastrous fire in Victoria, B. C. On the 28th of December the two-story brick block, owned and occupied by David Spencer as a department store, was damaged by fire and water to the extent of $150,000. The firemen, under the new chief, had a difficult task for two hours. The yearly losses in Victoria were greatly augmented during the last six .months of 1901. When Chief Deasy resigned the losses for the first six months amounted to $2,000. From that time the losses kept on accumulating until the high’ est record in fifteen years was attained in a few months. The 105 alarms and fires were above the average and the total losses for the year amounted to almost $200,000. The former chief ascribes the losses to the call system in vogue in that city.— Two hotels on the line of the Nanaimo and Esquimalt railroad were recently burned to the ground, entailing losses estimated at $10,000.—Trinity parish Episcopal church was destroyed at Seattle, Wash., on the morning of the 20th inst. The cause of the fire is a mystery. The building was constructed eleven years ago and cost $65,000. The splendid organ, valued at $7,000, was ruined.—Rat Portage, in the Northwest territories of Canada, recently suffered from two disastrous fires. The fire department worked valiantly at both fires and saved the principal portion of the town.—Chief Lillie, of Nelson, B. C., has been suspended by the mayor. The reason for the suspension has been stated by the mayor as complaints from others which will no doubt be investigated.— A fire at Kali spel, Mont., destroyed a block of buildings valued at $10,000. The fire occurred on January 22.—A fire of incendiary origin broke out at Goldfields, Mont., on January 21, and for forty minutes the town was in great danger through lack of water. After tearing down a number of buildings, the fire was stopped, but not before property valued at $36,000 had been destroyed.