PACIFIC COAST FIRE NOTES.

PACIFIC COAST FIRE NOTES.

(Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.)

Mr A. G. Long, the Pacific coast agent of the Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing company, installed at North Yakima. Wash., a combination Champion, chemical fire engine and hose wagon, having two chemical cylinders, each of forty gallons capacity and steel hose bed for carrying 1,000 feet of half-inch fire hose. Chief Hauser is proud of it, as also are the city authorities. It is an exact duplicate of the combination engine delivered to the city of Seattle in November last. North Yakima has a fine team of horses, weighing about 1.500 each, and A. J. Lynch, formerly in the Tacoma fire department, is employed as driver. There are also four permanent firemen in the fire hall.—Chief Campbell, of Portland. Ore , is applying for a hose tower and other necessary improvements for his fire department.—Vancouver. B. C.. and Nelson. B. C„ installed Eastman Deluge sets, and the Nelson firemen are the first to install the VaienBader smoke-protector in the Province of British Columbia The Blvmner Bell foundry shipned an alarm hell to city of Nelson. Kootenay, B. C.—The Seattle firemen had a hard fight with a fire on the night of February 8. The fire gutted the top story of the Seattle Cereal company’s mill and. with water, did damage amounting to $20000.—Nelson. B. C.. is again without a chief of its fire department. The council is calling for applications for the position.— Dawson, the treat mining centre on the Klondike, is now a full-fledged city. The property owners decided to incorporate, and the control of the fire department will he vested in the mayor and board of aldermen – White Horse installed a fire engine. This nlace is a town on the road to Dawson. The engine is located in a hole on the hanks of the river. The engine house is beneath the ground, and the engine remains stationary while the hose is laid out to the scene of a fire. In the winter time the suction is below the icc in the river.

PACIFIC COAST FIRE NOTES.

PACIFIC COAST FIRE NOTES.

(Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.) SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Jan. 5, 1901.

Chief Sullivan, of the San Francisco fire department, is recovering from an attack of illness and will again be on duty in a few days.—The Seattle fire department began the new year with a fire in the old Yesler building, used as the Public library. The losses will total $30,000. Assistant Chief Cook and several firemen had narrow escapes from serious injury. While returning to the fire hall one of the steam fire engines overturned and was dragged quite a distance by the three horses attached.—Calgary, the home of Chief Smart, was recently visited by a fire which caused losses estimated at $100,000. The thermometer was below zero and everything frozen solid. The firemen had a hard straggle to save the remainder of the city.—Chief Deasy reports losses estimated at $11,400 during the year in the city of Victoria, B. C. The losses for fourteen years averaged $26,000 annually. Vancouver, B. C. reports correspondingly small losses, and throughout the whole Province of British Columbia the losses for the year will not exceed $150,000.—Secretary H. W. Bringhurst, of the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs, is engaged in publishing the proceedings of the last convention.—A. G. Long, of Portland, Ore., furnished the fire department of Kitkahtla, B. C., with a fire engine and all the neccessary equipment for a fire department.—Chief Campbell, of Portland, Ore., received a call for assistance from a neighboring town and in thirty minutes a steam engine and a crew of firemen were on a train and speeding to the aid of the endangered place.