Paint Shop Fire in Elizabeth

Paint Shop Fire in Elizabeth

Fire, which started in the cellar of the building at 123 First street, Elizabeth, N. J , occupied by the store of John P. Arnold & Co., at 12.02 p. m., November 18, swept up the elevator shaft to the first floor and then followed the same course to the second and third floors and out through the roof, the fire burning on all three floors when the fire department, commanded by Chief Engineer August Gerstung, arrived. The fire burned three hours and fifty-six minutes. The fire, the cause of which is not known, was discovered by the owner. The contents of the building consisted of a stock of paints, oils, wall paper, etc., and valued at about $35,000, most of which was ruined. The interior of the building itself was not very badly damaged, most of the damage being in the vicinity of the elevator shaft, which acted as a flue for the flames. Chief Gerstung had in service three AmericanLa France steamers, two Amoskeag steamers and two aerial trucks. Nine engine streams were thrown. The department had four streams on the roof of an adjoining building, three in the rear of the building and two in front. 3,200 feet of hose were in use and nozzles were 1 Ji-inch. Fire hydrants within 500 feet of the fire were available. The presure at the hydrants was 28 pounds and was sufficient for the department’s needs. The building, 25 by too feet, three stories high, of brick construction, was built nine years ago. There, was no private fire protection on the premises and no special means to save life. The fire department has come in for much praise for its efficient work in not only preventing the spread of the fire to other buildings, but in extinguishing it before the structure was wrecked.

SCENE AT ARNOLD PAINT SHOP FIRE, ELIZABETH, N. J.

Photo courtesy E’izabeth “Journal.”

Captain Fred Leighton, of Engine 4. Brockton, Mass , reached the 25th anniversary of his appointment as a fireman, December 17. He has lost but one’ day during that time on account of sickness. He has never sustained an injury serious enough to cause him to leave his work for an hour. Captain Leighton is 66 years of age. but doesn’t look 45. He served as assistant chief during 1906 and part of 1907.

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