PANIC IN A ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOL.

PANIC IN A ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOL.

MISCELLANY

A fire was discovered, between 10 and 11 o’clock Wednesday morning, in one of the rooms on the ground floor of the Webster School, in St. Louis, at Eleventh and Jefferson streets, the largest primary school building in the city. The school fire alarm was immediately struck, and the teachers and scholars throughout the building were given notice of the danger. The children on the ground floor got out safely and in good order, but those on the upper floor were seized with a panic and, despite the utmost exertions of the teachers, rushed wildly to the stairways, shrieking with terror, down which they hurled themselves in the greatest frenzy and confusion. The pressure was so great on the stairs between the second and ground floors that the balusters gave way. and several children were precipitated to the floor below. Mia Levick had her arm broken; Emma Dillon was badly hurt about the head and Ihe upper part of her person, by the balusters falling on her, and Eva Schaffer was severely bruised. That a score of them were not killed outright is most marvelous, but these are all the casualties to the children that are nowknown. Mrs. Baltazzer, a teacher, in her effort to stay the rushing tide at the head of the sta’rs, was hurled from her feet, trampled upon, and b rne to the bottom, where she was dragged out. very much bruised, but not seriously hurt. The sch ol was finally emptied and something like order was restored, when it was discovered that ihe lire was only a trifling affair, and it was soon mastered. The panic was confined to the girls. The boys were all discharged from the different rooms without c infusion or trouble. The terr. r of the girls seems to have been greatly increased by the ringing of the large bell on top of the school-house by some unknown person.

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