Partial Meterage

Partial Meterage

A city which as yet is only partly metered is Moline, Ill. According to a report issued by Harry Lundquist, meter inspector of the water department of that city, the meter users consumed 383,908,000 gallons of water during the twelve months ended February 28. The average daily pumpage of the water works of Moline is said to lie 4,000,000 gallons, which shows that approximately one fourth of the services are metered. Of these, 1,257 are residences, and, according to the records, these services used 67,426,000 gallons, making an average to the residence of 53,640 gallons. And now comes the statement in the report that illustrates the injustice of allowing part of the services to go unmetered. Mr. Lundquist, according to his statement, believes that the unmetered houses used much more than the accredited amount of the meter users. In other words these people, immune from measurement and with no check upon their wastage, can, and in many cases do. let the water run away wantonly, and only have to pay the flat rate that is charged for nonmetered services. It is no wonder that the meter inspector declares emphatically for universal meterage for his city. Of course a partially metered system is better than one with no meters at all in use, but the only fair and logical method of water taxation, that is just to all concerned, is that of complete meterage. This fact is becoming more and more generally recognized, not only by water works superintendents, but also by the public generally, who are beginning to learn that meterage, with the use of approximately the same amount of water, but eliminating the waste, which does no one any good, is more economical than the old flat rate system.

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