PAWTUCKET AND ITS FIRE DEPARTMENT.

PAWTUCKET AND ITS FIRE DEPARTMENT.

Chief Lewis F. Butler, of the Pawtucket, R. I., fire department, in his second annual report records 127 alarms from October 1, 1900, to October 1, 1901, with a loss of $30,274.72; insurance paid, $25,024.72; loss over insurance, $5,250; average loss per fire, $398.35 The roll of the department is as follows: Chief engineer, Lewis F. Butler; first assistant engineer, John C. Perry; second assistant engineer, Charles H. Fuller; nine captains (six permanent); six lieutenants (permanent); nine drivers (permanent); fifteen permanent, and fourteen call men—total, fifty seven officers and men. The apparatus consists of two steamers; six combination hose and chemical wagons,each carrying 800 feet of two and one-half-inch hose and 200 feet of chemical hose ; three hook and ladder trucks; seven supply wagons; one two-seated light wagon; one rubber-tired buggy; one two-horse, four-wheeled hose carriage (in reserve); 14,400 feet of hose (cotton and rubber-lined) in firstclass condition. Chief Lewis asks for an appropriation of $42,180 for the ensuing year. He recommends that $600 be set aside for a storage fire alarm battery to take the place of the existing gravity, as much surer and more economical, and making the salaries of all the permanent captains $10.15 a week, instead of being graded, as at present. The details of the report show that Chief Lewis has ably combined economy with efficiency, and saved much money to the city by employing permanent men to do repairs and other work to the houses and apparatus. This they have done “cheerfully and in the best of manner” The discipline of the department, he points out, “is of the best; the men are ever ready and alert, to perform all the duties required of them,” and their valuable help, as well as that of his assistant chiefs, is highly appreciated by Chief Lewis, of whose services his fellow citizens and his officers and men are equally appreciative.

CHIEF LEWIS F BUTLER.
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