PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF AN ELECTRIC SHOCK.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF AN ELECTRIC SHOCK.

Thinking some of the readers of The Electrical World might be interested in a personal experience of a shock by an intermittent current, I will give an account of one that occurred to me. On touching two terminals to close a circuit on some experimental apparatus, I thought of course I had grasped the insulation, but the bare end of a flexible wire managed to touch my right hand fingers while I held the binding screw in the other hand. I was instantly thrown down and held perfectly rigid, unable to speak, it seemed to me, for two or three minutes, but probably twenty or thirty seconds would be nearer the actual truth. I felt unconsciousness coming on, when suddenly I became loosened and I lay perfectly limp a moment or so. I got up, but was scarcely able to walk, the pains being greatest in the hips. However, I got a voltmeter and found 140 volts on the circuit, and the alternations or intermittences were 150 per second, while I found my resistance, under the same conditions, to be 4500 ohms. The wire that slipped out of my hand left a burn on my forefinger in the shape of an elliptical hole about 5-32 inch deep, and scarred the flesh about the hole at a radius of one-quarter inch. During the contact I felt difficulty in breathing, but five minutes afterward my skin was all aglow, as if a bath brush and Turkish towel had been used vigorously, while the respiration becamefull and a tritle quickened. Two days afterward I was all right, except a little soreness all over.—T. D. Bottome, in The Electrical World.

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