PHILADELPHIA FIRE STATISTICS.

PHILADELPHIA FIRE STATISTICS.

The Fire Insurance patrol of Philadelphia, Pa., has issued the following statistics: It was shown that fires in the city in 1901 numbered 3,017. In twenty-four of these the loss exceeded $10,000. The insurance on the buildings damaged amounted to $2,058,190. The largest fire was that at the Atlantic Refining company’s Point Breeze works on August 19, when the loss was $480,000. The next largest was that which originated in the store of Hunt, Wilkinson & Co., on October 25,which entailed a loss of $301,655. Other large fires enumerated were those of C. J. Webb & Co., at 116 Chestnut street, on May 4, loss $259,612 ; Robert H. Foerderer’s leather works, Frankford, October 22, loss $267,692 ; Tuttelman Brothers & Faggen,Frankford, February 28, lsss $115,005. The classifications submitted in the report gave the number of fires of unknown origin as 560, with a loss of $1,557,143. Those due to matches numbered 497, with a loss of $44,624, and other causes were as follows: Petroleum, 462, loss $29,931; gas jets, 223, $29,361; gas stoves and heaters, 161, $15,133 ; sparks from smoke stacks, thirty-five; $3,747; sparks from locomotives, seventy-one, $1,723; defective flues, 244, $26,485 ; electricity, eighty-nine, $17,724; spontaneous combustion, sixty-seven; $25,715; candles, sixtyfive, $4,489; fats, boiling over, etc., sixty, $3,578. The losses in places not insured aggregated $598,663. As to the kind of buildings damaged: Dwellings head the list, with a total of 1,464; but the loss was only $110,186, an average of $76.63. In losses: Stores and warehouses lead, with $838,622 in 483 fires. Other figures show that the firemen were called upon to extinguish flames in twenty-two furniture stores, nineteen storage houses, eighty-three grocery stores, 310 dry goods stores, fiftyfive textile mills, seven printing offices, fifty-three metal works, six morocco factories, seven shirt factories,two ice factories, fourteen clothing stores, six oil stores, four boats, twelve laundries, four planing mills,seventy stables, and one jewelry factory. These officers were elected: President, (George E. Wagner; secretary, Charles B. Hill; treasurer, James W. McAllister.

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