Philadelphia Must Meter Its Water

Philadelphia Must Meter Its Water

Director Cooke and Chief Dunlap, of the Philadelphia Water Bureau, have taken up the subject of water waste and have come to the conclusion that the city should be empowered to install meters where there is found to be unnecessary waste. It has been argued that upward of 100,000,000 gallons of water are being wasted in the city, and that something must be done to stop the leaks or the city will be forced to consider the building of another filter plant. It is contended that the city can save money and the consumer reduce the cost of water by installing meters that will be a check on employes who have allowed spigots to run when water was not actually required. Mr. Dunlap has stated to the council committee that if something is not done to stop waste, the city must prepare to expend $10,000,000 to meet the growing consumption and waste of water. He also said that the fixed charges on $10,000,000 can be saved by stopping waste of water.

[It is a positive fact that all reports received from places where meters have been adopted, are favorable to their use. Instead of causing curtailment of domestic supplies and extra cost, the opposite results invariably happen. The members of the Philadelphia committee need not have any apprehension that meterage will prove a hardship to the water users of the city. Every week instances of actual benefit and reduction in cost of water by measurement are printed in this journal and prove beyond question that the equitable method of furnishing water is through meters—ED.]

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