Planing Mill Burned at Portland

Planing Mill Burned at Portland

The Keautz planing mill, situated in the northwestern portion of Portland, Ore., caught fire from a bonfire some children had kindled in a pile of sawdust and left to burn itself out. The first alarm was pulled at 11:15 a. m. and Chief B. F. Dowell, when he arrived, sent in a second alarm at 11:30. The building was 50×100 feet, of wood, one story in height, and had been built 13 years. The apparatus consisted of two American-La France 1,000 gallon pumpers, three Metropolitan 1,000 gallon steamers, two motor hose cars and two ladder trucks. Ten 6-inch double hydrants were available, 200 feet apart, with a gravity pressure of 80 pounds. Six engine streams were thrown, nozzle sizes being 1 1/8 inches. The water main was 20 inches in diameter. In all, 4,000 feet of cotton rubberlined hose were laid. Until the arrival of Chief Dowell, Battalion Chief J. E. Young was in charge of the department. The building was valued at $22,000; loss, $5,000. The contents, machinery and lumber, valued at $15,000, were damaged to the extent of $12,800.

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