Plenty of Water at East Orange.

Plenty of Water at East Orange.

Although from the middle of June last year for nine weeks a large area of the Northwestern United States suffered intensely from drought, and the great Passaic valley, in which are situated the wells that supply East Orange, N. J., was practically dry above the Whippany river branch, yet the flow of the first group of these wells was not seriously diminished. At the same time, however, in order to avoid any chance of a scarcity of water, that group was relieved and the second group so arranged as to be used for all water required above the actual flow of the first group. By that means the drought was successfully passed, and at no time was there any scarcity of water for all uses in the city, even with the heavy streetsprinkling called for. Financially, the water department is flourishing. The showing would be better still, if the various city departments were charged with the amount of water used by them in their work or for the services rendered them by the department. Under private ownership by the Orange Water company, the city paid for all such service; under municipal ownership, however, the department cannot legally make actual charges. But, if the department received its due amount from the city, instead of carrying a “charity account,” the sinking fund payments might be used for the retirement of the waterworks bonds long before the time set for such retirement, or the water rates might be still further reduced. The high-record mark for house-connections made in 1905 was greatly exceeded last year. Three hundred and eighty-eight such connections were made, as against 325 for 1905 and 312 for 1906. The development of new streets in unexpected quarters compelled an equally unexpected amount of construction work, and this must be continued. In several districts, also, where 4-in. mains have been laid, the National Board of Underwriters has condemned these as being inadequate. In consequence of this laying of four 12-in. mains, two 10-in.—one reduced to 8-in. after reaching a certain point—and three 8-in. mains is recommended, as is also the laying of an auxiliary pipe-line from the reservoir to the city. At present there is only the one. To avoid that expense East Orange might be connected with Newark’s 5-in. main in Bloomfield avenue, which would give an ample supply. But, to hold up the additional pressure, additional mains must be laid throughout the city. Leakage in the reservoir has been completely stopped by the Sylvester process. Electrolysis, having made its appearance, especially in the house-services, the Public Service corporation, acknowledging its responsibility, has agreed to repay the cost of replacing the damaged services and will take steps to avoid such damage in the future. At the pumping stations are the two groups of wells already referred to, two centrifugal pumps, with motor, duplicate feed-pumps, three boilers and two main pumps. The reservoir is in two parts, and it is further protected by a bypass. The weak point of the equipment is that there is only one generator, instead of two, for operating the motors attached to the centrifugal pumps. For safety’s sake a second is called for. During the past year there were laid in the city 10,625 It. of 6-in. pipe; 846 of 4-in.; 825 of 12-in. The total number of feet of main laid is 417,722; service-connections (6-in. to (4-in), 5,919; gate-valves (24-in. to 2-in.), 985; hydrants (453 Ludlow, forty-two O’Brien), 495, besides fourteen special hydrants for street-sprinkling; meters, 412; pumpage, by Snow high-duty pumping engines (two units of 4,000,000,000 gal. capacity each) 884,145,408 gal., daily average 2,422,316 per lb. of coal, 313 gal., coal consumed, 2,824,630 lb., average dynamic force, 214.6, stroke, 26-in. duty (ft. lb.), 55,977,100, revolutions, 871,419. The estimated population of East Orange is 27,500, with 27,300 on lines of pipe and 27,200 supplied. The old works were constructed by the Orange Water comany in 1882; they became the property of the city in 1903. and a new system was built. The artesian wells at White Oak ridge. Millburn form the source of supply, the system being pumping to reservoir and gravity from reservoir to city. The cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses—$15,710.74) is $17.77 per 1.000,000 gal.; per 1.000,000 gal. raised 1 ft. (dynamic), $0,083. Of the 884,145.400 gal. consumed, 71,174,3/0 passed through meters (8 per cent, ot whole metered). Of the average daily consumption (2,422.300 gal.) the per capita consumption was to each inhabitant, go/ gal.: to each consumer, 91 /: to each tap. 423. The cost of supply per 1.000.000 gal. figured on total maintenance 4- interest on bonds was $84.06; on total maintenance + interest on bonds -4sinking fund, $103.09. The average length of each service for the entire system is 60.06 ft.: average cost of service for the year. $2830: percentage of service metered. 7 ner cent.; of receipts from metered water 11.7%: four motors in use. Arthur A. Reimer is engineer and superintendent.

In connection with the proposed reduction of water rents on the north side at Pueblo, Colo., the suggestion has been made that meters be installed.

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