PORCELAIN BUILDINGS

PORCELAIN BUILDINGS

A few years ago the chief of a western fire department created some amusement at a meeting of the International Association of Fire Engineers by stating that he thought buildings might be constructed of glass so that in case of fire they could be easily demolished. If this chief were alive to-day he would be greatly pleased to find that he had a near-believer in his theory in the person of an Englishman named W. Hales Turner, who calls himself a “pioneer of porcelain.” This enthusiast declares that a home of porcelain can be erected with a screw driver and wrench in a few hours, that in its construction there is a complete absence of all absorbent materials, such as bricks and mortar, plaster, whitewash, concrete, woodwork and paper, the complete porcelain house being constructed with framework preferably of light, rust-proof metal. In this frame-work are fitted the large porcelain panels, half an inch thick, six feet long and three feet wide, weighing five pounds to the superficial foot, decorated and glazed on both sides to resist wind, storm and weather, with steam-tight joints made of copper-coated asbestos tape. Porcelain being non-absorbent, insect and germ proof, fireproof and washable, makes possible for all a perfectly hygienic home. As for warmth, an inch-thick wall of pure porcelain glazed both sides is better able to keep out cold than an eighteen-inch brick wall With bricks and mortar it takes months to erect a house, of say, five rooms; a porcelain house of the same size can be put up in a few hours. Mr. Turner does not give the cost of construction or weight that a porcelain structure could be made to bear, but it is likely his scheme only applies to dwellings, in which case the weight to be sustained would not be so important. In case the porcelain building idea might ever become a reality, and there is no reason why it should not, then the work of fire extinguishment, would assume another form, as the most expeditious and affective way to stop a fire in it would be with a light field gun charged with explosive balls. Another important factor to be considered in the porcelain house would be its fire prevention qualities. With fireproof walls such as the material would afford the chances of fire spreading would be greatly reduced.

PORCELAIN BUILDINGS

PORCELAIN BUILDINGS

A few years ago the chief of a western fire department created some amusement at a meeting of the International Association of Fire Engineers by stating that he thought buildings might be constructed of glass so that in case of fire they could be easily demolished. If this chief were alive to-day he would be greatly pleased to find that he had a near-believer in his theory in the person of an Englishman named W. Hales Turner, who calls himself a “pioneer of porcelain.” This enthusiast declares that a home of porcelain can be erected with a screw driver and wrench in a few hours, that in its construction there is a complete absence of all absorbent materials, such as bricks and mortar, plaster, whitewash, concrete, woodwork and paper, the complete porcelain house being constructed with framework preferably of light, rust-proof metal. In this frame-work are fitted the large porcelain panels, half an inch thick, six feet long and three feet wide, weighing five pounds to the superficial foot, decorated and glazed on both sides to resist wind, storm and weather, with steam-tight joints made of copper-coated asbestos tape. Porcelain being non-absorbent, insect and germ proof, fireproof and washable, makes possible for all a perfectly hygienic home. As for warmth, an inch-thick wall of pure porcelain glazed both sides is better able to keep out cold than an eighteen-inch brick wall. With bricks and mortar it takes months to erect a house, of say, five rooms; a porcelain house of the same size can be put up in a few hours. Mr. Turner does not give the cost of construction or weight that a porcelain structure could be made to bear, but it is likely his scheme only applies to dwellings, in which case the weight to be sustained would not be so important. In case the porcelain building idea might ever become a reality, and there is no reason why it should not, then the work of fire extinguishment would assume another form, as the most expeditious and affective way to stop a fire in it would be with a light field gun charged with explosive halls. Another important factor to be considered in the porcelain house would be its fire prevention qualities. With fireproof walls such as the material would afford the chances of fire spreading would he greatly reduced.