Portland, Ore., Fire Intensified by Drum of Gasoline

Portland, Ore., Fire Intensified by Drum of Gasoline

A burning boat on the Columbia River was the cause of the recent fire that destroyed property on the waterfront in Portland, Ore., covering a space 50 feet deep and 200 feet long. It was 30 years old and built of wood, one story high, and easily ignited from Sparks blown from the boat, which was near. A box alarm was pulled at 9 p.m., and when the department arrived, under command of Assistant Chief Laudenkloss, the fire had reached the inside of the building and gained great headway, according to the report of Edw. Grenfell, who states that it was intensified by a drum of gasoline left on the dock, which is a transgression of the law. The guilty party, he adds, was arrested and fined. There were 86 men engaged, who employed four AmericanLaFrance steamers, two 1,000-gallon American-LaFrance pumping engines, four trucks, two fire-boats and two hose trucks. Within three blocks twenty-three hydrants were available, mostly 6-inch double, at distances varying from 80 to 200 feet apart and some 600 feet from the burning structure. The water mains were 16 and 6 inches in size, and furnished an 80-pound pressure from a gravity system. About 5,500 feet of cotton rubberlined hose were laid, and the fire-boats on the river used turrets. The fire was stopped in an hour in the place of origin; the loss on the property being $10,000, and that on the contents, consisting of ship supplies, seeds, feed, etc., valued at $175,000, was estimated at $75,000.

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