Praise for Harrisburg Firemen

Praise for Harrisburg Firemen

The “Telegraph” of Harrisburg, Pa., of a recent date contained the following: “Seldom have firemen been called upon to fight flames under more adverse conditions than in the case of the old State Printery blaze last, night. Between high buildings, in narrow, smoke-filled streets, and facing a sharp breeze, they confined the fire to the building in which it started, and that was all any fire department could have accomplished under the circumstances. The wonder is that they did so well. They scarcely could have been blamed if the fire had swept over and destroyed some ot the adjacent property. That it did not is due wholly to the splendid work of the volunteers who manned the engines and the hose lines. So long as fight-fighting is as well done as it was last night, Harrisburg is not in serious need of a paid department, in the sense that the volunteers are not capable of coping with the situation, but it is not fair to ask men to risk health and life without pay to save property in which they have no financial interest, no matter how willing they are to give their services. The death of William H. Harris is an example of this. Harris was a fine type of the volunteer fireman. Reckless of self, he rushed to the fire last night and gave up his life for the work. The point we wish to make is this—that the city has reached a point where it ought not to ask men to take the risk Harris ran unless they are paid and their services come within their regular lines of daily occupation.”

No posts to display